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Green open spaces
25 Feb 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Salford Park: home of the Aston Reservoir, near Spaghetti Junction

My visit to Salford Park was near the end of December 2016. The park is near the Lichfield Road in Aston, and is next to the M6 motorway and Spaghetti Junction. The River Tame flows to the north of this park, which is mostly just the Reservoir. The Cross City Line to Lichfield is also nearby as well as the Tame Valley Canal. Not forgetting Star City. You might see the reservoir from the M6

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Salford Park: home of the Aston Reservoir, near Spaghetti Junction





My visit to Salford Park was near the end of December 2016. The park is near the Lichfield Road in Aston, and is next to the M6 motorway and Spaghetti Junction. The River Tame flows to the north of this park, which is mostly just the Reservoir. The Cross City Line to Lichfield is also nearby as well as the Tame Valley Canal. Not forgetting Star City. You might see the reservoir from the M6


My visit to Salford Park was on the 30th December 2016. I had got the train on the Chase Line to Walsall. Coming back I got off at Aston, and walked up the Lichfield Road to check out the park, reservoir, and then head under Spaghetti Junction on a section of the Tame Valley Canal.

 

For my other park posts (of parks that are near the M6), please check out: Witton Lakes Park and Brookvale Park.

 

There is a Wikipedia page about the Aston Reservoir.

Aston Reservoir has also been known as either: Salford Lake, Salford Park Pool or Salford Bridge Reservoir. It was a 19th century reservoir, formerly used for drinking water extracted from the River Tame. It was built by the Birmingham Waterworks Company, which at the time was in the parish of Aston. On the 1st January 1876 the company was bought by the Birmingham Corporation Water Department

In recent years, the reservoir has been using as a boating lake, but that is no longer the case. It was used for speedboat racing in the 1950s.

 

My first view of Salford Park from the Lichfield Road. Behind is the Aston Expressway, A38(M), with the lanes from the Gravelly Hill Interchange (Spaghetti Junction). That bridge goes over the River Tame.

This old Birmingham City Council sign from the Department of Recreation and Community Services. Calling the park: Salford Park and Stadium.

Powerleague Birmingham is based at these football pitches to the left of the main entrance. Aston Expressway and the lanes from Spaghetti Junction seen behind.

This Power League sign was seen from the Lichfield Road. The main entrance to the park is to the left of here.

Trees in the park. From here I saw an abandoned crashed car. Would assume that officers from Birmingham City Council removed it during January 2017.

More trees in the park. The park is morethe reservoir than trees and grass.

Entering the park, I think the two men (at the time) were fishing in the reservoir. Bollards prevents cars getting in, but as I headed into the park, I saw an abandoned crashed car (windows all smashed).

Heading around the reservoir towards the River Tame. A lorry is seen heading onto the Aston Expressway.

The east end of the reservoir is quite curved here. As you see the Aston Expressway heading into the City Centre. Mostly from here the lanes coming in from the M6 at Junction 6.

One more view of the reservoir from this side before heading to the Tame Valley Canal.

This path is between the Aston Expressway and the River Tame. I went out of the park, and back onto the Lichfield Road, and got onto the Tame Valley Canal from the Salford Bridge.

A look at the Salford Bridge at the point where it crosses the River Tame. With the M6 going over it. To get onto the Tame Valley Canal you have to go up to the bridge, then down the towpath at the Canalside Walk.

A look at the Salford Bridge at the exit from Salford Park (to the right). The towpath to the canal was accessed from near the bridge.

This view of the M6 from Salford Park. You can see the River Tame in front.

Now on the Salford Bridge as I headed to the Canalside Walk entrance for the Tame Valley Canal under the M6.

Reflections of the concrete columns seen in the River Tame from the Salford Bridge. That's the M6 up there.

Under the M6 and between the River Tame and Tame Valley Canal. Not much to see here other than the concrete columsn and those metals bars near the metal fences.

View from the Salford Bridge of the Tame Valley Canal, it wasn't until I went down that I saw youths riding motorbikes illegally up and down the towpath (which was intimidating and very unsafe).

Heading down the ramp, a look at the Salford Bridge. I think the youths were up that way under the M6. I turned onto the towpath and headed to the left.

Now on the towpath of the Tame Valley Canal. The bridge ahead carries the A5127 Gravelly Hill towards the A38(M) Aston Expressway. A slip road from the Tyburn Road also heads in that direction.

Under the bridge, there was graffiti on the other side. Including something that Bill Drummond had done. I expect that all of this graffiti has changed in the following 3 years.

It was a bit like a long tunnel with open concrete columns on the right. Like a bit of a silhouette. Daylight ahead.

Under Spaghetti Junction as the M6 was on the left and a southbound slip road from the Aston Expressway, A38(M) was on the right. Looks a bit weird from down here.

Under another bridge, probably a slip road leading from Salford Circus onto the M6 northbound.

I think that's now the M6 heading to the right. Beyond was railway bridges for the Cross City Line, between Aston and Gravelly Hill stations.

Getting off the Tame Valley Canal, I found a path that led back towards Salford Park. More slip roads of Spaghetthi Junction above with an old bridge railway bridge carrying the Cross City Line towards Lichfield. I think the slip road on the left is coming off the Aston Expressway, A38(M) onto the M6 Northbound, while the slip road on the right is coming from Salford Circus.

Now following the path back to Salford Park under the Aston Expressway, A38(M), from the slip road coming off the M6 Northbound and Southbound. Salford Park would be to the left over a bridge that crosses the River Tame. Area on the right fenced off with work vans.

Heading back into Salford Park after my short walk down the Tame Valley Canal. The path went between the Cross City Line and some of the lanes linked to the Aston Expressway. Leading to this footbridge over the River Tame.

With the River Tame to the right and the Aston Expressway to the left, I was heading back into Salford Park which was over to the right.

Now back in Salford Park with the Aston Expressway to the left and Aston Reservoir to the right. There is a path to the north side of the reservoir, but I think at the time I didn't walk up it, having just come off the Tame Valley Canal under the Motorways.

Aston Reservoir from the west end of the park. Aston Expressway in the distance.

Geese and gulls in the reservoir.

The south west corner of Aston Reservoir, with the Aston Expressway to the left. After this, I followed a path out of Salford Park, and headed back to Aston Station to catch a train back to Birmingham New Street. The wasteland I saw 3 years ago, has now since been built on. You can also get the 65 or 67 buses up to Salford Park if you want to explore this park and the canals.

This was the view from the National Express West Midlands Platinum bus on the X5 I caught from Erdington back in January 2019. Heading along the Aston Expressway between Gravelly Hill and Aston.

From the bus you can see Salford Park and the Aston Reservoir, while above is the lanes coming off the M6, Junction 6, which links to the Aston Expressway, A38(M). Both from southbound and northbound lanes joining up.

Scaffolding under Spaghetti Junction. You have to remember that it was completed way back in 1972, and in recent years engineers have had to repair the concrete columns and the structure carrying the road above.

On the coach during September 2019, we were heading back into Birmingham from Cheltenham and Broadway (after a riding on the Gloucestershire Warwickshire Steam Railway). See my post on that here: Gloucestershire Warwickshire Steam Railway from Cheltenham Race Course to Broadway. The coach driver took a weird route heading back into Birmingham, leaving the A435 and heading on the M42 towards the M6. Only getting off at Spaghetti Junction. I saw the Aston Reservoir in Salford Park from the coach, a long with the Birmingham skyline (to the left).

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Now at 1,100 followers. Thank you.

Birmingham We Are People with Passion award winner 2020

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Green open spaces
24 Feb 2020 - Elliott Brown
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Hillfield Park in Monkspath, Solihull

Another park that I found on Google Maps that I wanted to check out. Hillfield Park is located in Monkspath, Solihull. Not far from Shirley and the M42. There is a footpath that you can follow along an unnamed stream from the Stratford Road. I went on a nice sunny day during January 2020. It is near the no 5 bus route and the Monkspath Business Park. Widney Manor Golf Club is nearby too.

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Hillfield Park in Monkspath, Solihull





Another park that I found on Google Maps that I wanted to check out. Hillfield Park is located in Monkspath, Solihull. Not far from Shirley and the M42. There is a footpath that you can follow along an unnamed stream from the Stratford Road. I went on a nice sunny day during January 2020. It is near the no 5 bus route and the Monkspath Business Park. Widney Manor Golf Club is nearby too.


I did not know that this park existed, when I was in Solihull Town Centre one time, I checked Google Maps and found Hillfield Park. Although that time I walked down to Tudor Grange Park, and left Hillfield Park for another time.

For my Tudor Grange Park post follow this link: Tudor Grange Park: former estate of the Bird family, now near Solihull College. And for Malvern & Brueton Parks follow this link: Malvern and Brueton Parks: from Solihull Town Centre to the M42.

OK back to Hillfield Park. First up with some history from the Wikipedia page Hillfield Park.

The park was converted from a former landfill site, and opened to the public in 1984 in Monkspath, Solihull. It covers and area of 2 acres. There is a small lake in the park. In 2009 a new children's playground was built. The park is home to a variety of birds including: swallows, swifts, herons and buzzards.

 

I got into the park from a public footpath that follows an unnamed stream from the Stratford Road. Starting near the Costa Coffee at the Friars Gate business park. I got off my bus on Marshall Lake Road and walked down the Stratford Road to the Costa (for a drink and toastie), before heading up the path to Hillfield Park. Was a nice day with a blue sky during January 2020. I followed the path, but briefly got off at Radway Road, and had to go up to Highlands Road, before I went down and rejoined the path. A bridge actually crosses above the path, which was a bit muddy. Eventually I got into Hillfield Park.

 

First view of Hillfield Park at the end of the path. Like a curtain of trees revealing the park and the green grass lawns.

Over a small footbridge, the stream or brook flows into the lake.

Zoom in to the lake as some gulls flew about, with other gulls in the lake itself.

Perfect blue sky, looking back at the path I had just walked along. The Business Park was not that far away from here.

The path around the lake briefly took me out of the park onto Lakeside Drive. And saw this pair of trees. Was too many trees around the lake on this side to see it.

First proper view of this lake, the trees were thin enough to see it from here.

Another perfect blue sky with the lawn looking green and shadows from the trees, as an electicity pylon is seen in the park.

This lake was quite small in comparison to the lakes I saw a month earlier at Witton Lakes and Brookvale Park. I only went as far as the viewpoint, and not all the way around the lake.

Mostly gulls in the lake from the viewpoint and some ducks. Was bright sunshine from this side.

The sun shining over Hillfield Park as it reflects off the lake as several ducks swim by. Had a similar effect with the sun like this over at Witton Lakes and Brookvale Park.

Railings around the viewpoint of the lake as there was several Domestic Ducks on the bank of the lake.

Now heading up the path past the electricity pylon. The playground facilities was straight ahead of here, as I followed the path towards Monkspath Hall Road. There is at least one more path here that I did not follow if I ever go back.

The blue sky that Sunday afternoon in January continued to be stunning! Bit like one of those old default Microsoft Windows wallpapers from the Windows XP era.

Saw this footbridge over the lawn which I soon would cross, was making nice shadows from this side.

Football goalposts in the distance and several electricity pylons on the blue sky.

Now crossing the footbridge as it made brilliant shadows in the sunshine. Was several puddles around.

So much bright sunshine as the sun shined above the field and electricity pylon (on the right).

Almost near the Monkspath Hall Road exit as the trees made shadows on the lawn.

A basketball court near the path that led to the Monkspath Hall Road exit.

This view of the field in the park from Monkspath Hall Road.

I headed to Shelley Crescent where I had more than half an hour to wait for a no 5 bus back to Birmingham. But saw a pair going in the Solihull direction. Probably should have got a bus back into Solihull Town Centre rather than wait ages for a bus back into Birmingham.

Another possibility (if I turned left and not right) would have to walk up Widney Lane towards Marshall Lake Road (as my regular bus route would have been more reliable on a Sunday afternoon). Or to walk towards Widney Manor Station (which was where my previous walk from Malvern & Brueton Park ended last year).

 

For more on my Hillfield Park photos, check out my album on Flickr: Hillfield Park.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Now at 1,100 followers. Thank you.

Birmingham We Are People with Passion award winner 2020

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24 Feb 2020 - Elliott Brown
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Brookvale Park: following on from Witton Lakes with another large lake to walk around

It made sense at the time while being in Witton Lakes Park to continue the walk into Brookvale Park as it was nearby (and save travelling back there another time). This park is even closer to the M6 than Witton Lakes is, so you can near the noise of the passing traffic. There is a Peace Dove sculpture to see near the start of the walk. We went clockwise around the lake. Xmas Day 2019.

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Brookvale Park: following on from Witton Lakes with another large lake to walk around





It made sense at the time while being in Witton Lakes Park to continue the walk into Brookvale Park as it was nearby (and save travelling back there another time). This park is even closer to the M6 than Witton Lakes is, so you can near the noise of the passing traffic. There is a Peace Dove sculpture to see near the start of the walk. We went clockwise around the lake. Xmas Day 2019.


Just after midday on the 25th December 2019 (Christmas Day) we continued our morning walk from Witton Lakes Park into the nearby park that is Brookvale Park.

My post on Witton Lakes is here to click to read and view the photos: Witton Lakes Park: a pair of lakes north of the M6.

 

First up a bit of history from Wikipedia: Brookvale Park.

The park is located in the Stockland Green area of Birmingham (within the Constituency of Erdington). The park has tennis courts, a bowling green, a children's play area and a sailing club.

I'll skip the history mentioned from the 11th to 12th centuries to the 19th century. A waterworks company in 1826 was formed to supply water to the people of Birmingham. In 1856, a waterworks company acquired the Brookvale site from Wyrley Birch. This was then known as the Lower Witton Reservoir. The Birmingham Corporation bought the waterworks company in 1876. Erdington had it's own Urban District Council in the late 19th century. The park opened in 1909. The lake was used until 1926 as an open air swimming pool. The lake and the park are now operated by Birmingham City Council.

 

Having left Witton Lakes Park at Marsh Hill, we crossed over the road, and headed onto George Road. We headed up the path. To the right was a path named Georgina's Way.

Saw these Canada geese and this swan. Almost thought about going around the lake anti-clockwise, but I saw a sculpture on the other side, so we crossed the bridge and headed in a clockwise direction instead.

From the bridge is the first proper view of the Brookvale Park Lake. The brook that flows from the pair of Witton Lakes continues into this lake.

A close up look at the Dove of Peace sculpture at the north west corner of the lake. It was sculpted by the artist Michael Scheuermann. There was a lot of trees around the lake on this side and a lot of bright sunshine.

Heading up the path, I spotted this Guiness World Records Certificate for the most number of flower bulbs planted by the Stockland Green Community Group at Brookvale Park on the 9th November 2014. Well done, congratulations. OFFICIALLY AMAZING

Not too far up from that was this sign for John Biddle Walk, which is now the name of the path (running parallel to George Road). Unveiled for the WW1 1914-1918 Centenary, John Biddle served on HMS Monmouth. He died on the 1st November 1914, aged only 23. I would assume this was unveiled 100 years later in 2014.

To the south east corner of Brookvale Park. Near where George Road meets Park Road and Rosary Road. There is a pair of former toilet blocks (one pictured on the left). As well as the Duck and Reed sculpture gate posts. This was as far as I saw them as we continued around the path following the lake.

First view of the Brookvale Park Lake not obscured by trees, and without too much bright sunshine. But the sky was blue and not many clouds in the sky. Saw one lone swan on the lake.

A zoom in to the swan in the lake, it made a nice reflection in the brilliant sunshine that day.

On the left was the playground, or Play Park. The sunlight was getting a bit too bright on the right.

This is the Sailing Club, beyond the bollards (near Park Road and North Park Road). Also includes the Park Offices.

Close up of the Sailing Club. I would guess that they take the boats out of this building. The Park Keeper's Office is on the right. Parking of cars is not allowed in front of these doors.

Some more swans, and a ramp for boats to go down into the lake. I did not see any boats here that day, probably as it was Christmas Day.

Several Domestic Ducks and Canada Geese. I think someone was feeding them bread (which people really shouldn't do, but they continue to do so anyway).

Heading up the path towards the entrance we came in on George Road. Which you can now see the houses behind the lake.

A branch in the lake with these birds grooming themselves. They are the Great cormorant.

The George Road houses were starting to make nice reflections in the lake. Was more decent views of the lake from this side than from the other side (due to the trees in the way over there).

For some reason, the path back felt much faster to walk down, than the path on the other side of the lake. Even the trees made a nice reflection!

A gull standing on a rock in the lake (I think). Walking on water.

Near the end of the path and caught this cyclist in a bright yellow jacket going past.

Before we knew it we had left Brookvale Park and was heading back into Witton Lakes Park to where we started originally on Perry Common Road.

Another park in the area is Short Heath Park, but from Google Maps it just looks like a small park with a field.

Salford Park is on the other side of the M6 and Spaghetti Junction. I will do a post on that park as soon as I can (it's on my Birmingham We Are park backlog to do). I went there in late December 2016.

 

For further photos of my visit to Brookvale Park, please check out my album on Flickr here: Brookvale Park.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Now at 1,100 followers. Thank you.

Birmingham We Are People with Passion award winner 2020

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20 Feb 2020 - FreeTimePays
Gallery

'All things Water' from across Birmingham & the West Midlands

Photo above courtesy Kevin Maslin

With all the heavy rain we have had let's share some wonderful  'all things water' photography from our brilliant and talanted people with real passion.

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'All things Water' from across Birmingham & the West Midlands





Photo above courtesy Kevin Maslin

With all the heavy rain we have had let's share some wonderful  'all things water' photography from our brilliant and talanted people with real passion.


Gas Street Basin

Photo courtesy Chris Fletcher

 

Moseley Park & Pool

Photo courtesy Barry Whitehead

 

Gas Street Basin

Photo courtesy Christine Wright

 

Birmingham & Fazeley Canal

Photo courtesy Kevin Maslin

 

Along the canals just past Digbeth

Photo courtesy Tammie Naughton

 

Doing the loop the canal way in Birmingham

Photo courtesy Jay Mason Burns 

 

Brindleyplace

Photo courtesy Damien Walmsley

 

Edgbaston Reservoir 

Photo courtesy Daniel Sturley

 

Witton Lakes Park

Photo courtesy Elliott Brown

 

Gas Street Basin

Photo courtesy Mac McCreery

 

Swanshurst Park

Photo courtesy Karl Newton

 

Gas Street Basin

Photo courtesy Pete Davies

 

It's good to get out for a ride or walk on our West Midland Canals

Photo courtesy Peter Leadbetter

 

Urban Autumn in Birmingham

Photo courtesy Victoria Ball

 

250 years since West Bromwich was linked to Birmingham by canal

Photo courtesy Kevin Maslin

 

Cannon Hill Park Lake 

Photo courtesy Karl Newton

 

Gas Street Basin in Snow

Photo courtesy Daniel Sturley

 

Early evening sunset at Gas Street Basin in Birmingham

Photo courtesy Chris Fletcher

 

Regency Wharf in Birmingham

Photo courtesy Barry Whitehead

 

Fox Hollies Park

Photo courtesy Tammie Naughton

 

The Blue Hour, Edgbaston Reservoir 

Photo courtesy Karl Newton

 

Autumnal reflections

Photo courtesy Jay Mason Burns

 

Kings Heath Park, Birmingham

Photo courtesy Christine Wright

 

Canal Journey 

Photo courtesy Damien Walmsley

 

Pool in Moseley Park

Photo courtesy Elliott Brown

 

Cannon Hill Park, Birmingham

Photo courtesy Peter Leadbetter

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Green open spaces
20 Feb 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Witton Lakes Park: a pair of lakes north of the M6

Not far from Witton Cemetery is Witton Lakes Park. It's also quite close to the M6. On the Christmas Day morning of December 2019, we went on a walk around this park. There was also time to pop into Brookvale Park (post coming soon). The walk started at Perry Common Road and passed both lakes towards Marsh Hill and back. Was lucky that morning to have a blue sky and clear weather.

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Witton Lakes Park: a pair of lakes north of the M6





Not far from Witton Cemetery is Witton Lakes Park. It's also quite close to the M6. On the Christmas Day morning of December 2019, we went on a walk around this park. There was also time to pop into Brookvale Park (post coming soon). The walk started at Perry Common Road and passed both lakes towards Marsh Hill and back. Was lucky that morning to have a blue sky and clear weather.


Is it too late to say "Merry Christmas"? On the 25th December 2019 we headed up to Witton Lakes Park for a Christmas Day morning walk around this park with a pair of lakes. Such a lovely morning. Had blue skies and sunshine. Plenty of birds about such as geese, swans and ducks etc.

First some history from Wikipedia: Witton Lakes. They are a former pair of drinking reservoirs between Perry Common and Erdington. They are fed by two brooks from Kingstanding and from Bleak Hill in Erdington. They overspill into the Brookvale Park Lake before eventually reaching the River Tame. The brooks are natural. The lakes were created near the end of the 19th century to supply drinking water for Birmingham. At the time they were in the countryside but when Birmingham grew and got industrialised, the water was no longer fit for drinking. So the City turned to the Elan Valley in Wales for a supply. One lake is now used for model boating, the other for nature conservation. The North Birmingham Cycle route runs through the park.

 

Getting into the park from Perry Common Road and following this path towards the lakes.

As the path continues, the trees made some nice shadows in the sunshine.

Field to the right of the path, I was more interested in seeing the pair of lakes. I found this park a few months before looking on Google Maps when I was last in Erdington.

Crossing over this footbridge near a brook that feeds into the first lake I would see. This is part of the National Cycle Network route 535. Also known as the North Birmingham Cycle / Walk Route. You can follow a nearby sign to Stockland Green or to the City Centre.

A look at the brook in the direction of the lakes. This bridge with a grill was closed off (I don't think members of the public can walk over it).

First view of the first lake. Clouds were clearing, the sky already looking blue. And plenty of birds around.

Several low rise tower blocks in the distance from this view of the lake. Four towers called: Huntington House, Kingsbridge House, Lynton House and Greenford House.

Near the end of the first lake. There is a nearby school called Wilson Stuart School. And Perry Common is in this direction.

Between the two lakes is this path and benches to sit and admire the lakes and the wildlife. Some nice shadows from the benches on the left.

This Tufted Duck was in the first lake that I saw. Viewed from the path betwen both of the lakes.

This is a Eurasian Wigeon, also seen in the first lake.

On the other side of the path that splits the lake. Another path that leads towards the North Birmingham Academy. Next it was time to walk around the second lake in the park.

There was a large family of swans with their young on the second lake. I would soon walk down the straight that leads to a waterfall or weir.

View of the second lake. The sky was looking so blue from here, hardly any clouds. A perfect morning.

Could this be a palm tree on the Witton Lakes? Maybe it would more impressive in the Summer, but in the Winter it looked good.

This Coot was swimming in this direction, making an interesting ripple effect in the lake water, making a V shape. Various gulls were behind.

This view of the second lake from the bridge over the weir or waterfall.

Now heading on the path towards Marsh Hill (and on towards Brookvale Park), saw this weir on the brook that follows out of the second lake.

Bright sunshine on the path towards Marsh Hill. Hard to believe that this was on Christmas Day. But then on Christmas Day's on years gone past we've had sunshine and blue skies before (I think).

Later after the walk around Brookvale Park, headed back through Witton Lakes. And got some more views of the second lake on the way back to the car park on Perry Common Road.

For more photos of this park, please check out my album on Flickr here: Witton Lakes Park.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Now at 1,100 followers. Thank you.

Birmingham We Are People with Passion award winner 2020

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