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Green open spaces
21 hours ago - Elliott Brown
Inspiration

Kings Heath Park over the years from 2012 to 2019

I might not be able to go to Kings Heath Park now (as it's not in walking distance), but we can look back at my photos taken between 2012 and 2019 when I was able to get an 11C to Kings Heath. Most of my early photos were taken around February 2012, and I have returned on and off ever since. Although probably went to this park as a child in the 1980s (using the playground).

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Kings Heath Park over the years from 2012 to 2019





I might not be able to go to Kings Heath Park now (as it's not in walking distance), but we can look back at my photos taken between 2012 and 2019 when I was able to get an 11C to Kings Heath. Most of my early photos were taken around February 2012, and I have returned on and off ever since. Although probably went to this park as a child in the 1980s (using the playground).


It's about time for a new Kings Heath Park post, but using my photos taken on walks around the park between 2012 and 2019. Usually travel to Kings Heath on the 11C bus, but the 76 also goes past the park. The bus stop is on the Vicarage Road, but I might sometimes now get off on Addison Road and stop off for a coffee before walking to the park (of course this was all before lockdown). The schools of King Edward VI Camp Hill are located next door to the park. The High Street and Alcester Road South are in walking distance of the park down Vicarage Road.

 

For my previous Kings Heath Park posts click the following links to read and enjoy the photos:

 

2012

I first had a photo walk around Kings Heath Park in early February 2012.

Near the corner of the Vicarage Road and Avenue Road entrance is The Lodge at 72 Vicarage Road.

Swings in the playground as a jogger runs past me. I probably used these facilities back in the 1980s (These are not the same swings and slides as when I was a child and there wasn't a perimeter fence 35 years ago, but was in the same location).

This slide has a cylindrical shaped for kids to climb up.

It was winter and it was very cold as I walked around the paths in the park. The grass was frosted. And it snowed later that day.

Some dirt paths amongst the trees. They lead to the ponds.

The pond was completely frozen over at the time.

View to the School of Horticultural Training in what was Kings Heath House. A Grade II listed building School of Horticultural Training (in Kings Heath Park), Birmingham.  Dates to the early 19th century. But a previous house on this site that was owned by John Harwood was burnt down in 1791 during the Birmingham 'Church and King' Riots of 1791 (according to Bill Dargue's site (Kings Heath - Bill Dargue). The City Council later bought the existing house and grounds in 1908. It became a training centre for Birmingham Parks staff and the Birmingham Horticultural Training School was housed here from 1952.

This view of the pond while frozen opposite the School of Horticultural Training.

A dirt path through some trees. At the furthest end of the park, not far from the Camp Hill Line.

Several branches lying on the ground near the bed of leaves.

Another playground close to the Avenue Road entrance with this tyre that kids can slide down the rope.

Also saw this squirrel at the time.

2013

Trees in Kings Heath Park seen during the middle of May 2013. This was the day of the Free Radio Walkathon (link to the post is above). The trees were seen on Vicarage Road.

A couple of weeks later and saw these bluebells from Avenue Road on the Late May Bank Holiday Weekend. From a walk down to Dog Pool Lane and Dad's Lane in Selly Park.

2014

The visit during a warm March 2014, was to see the TV Garden on an Open Sunday, I only had my then smartphone camera with me at the time.

Saw this flower tower. The flower pots were planted by Cofton Nursery (Birmingham Bloom).

There ws also this flower bed. I think it was close to Kings Heath House.

The pond in fine weather. I was trying to record a video clip but somehow also got this photo of the pond as well.

This time the sky was blue and the water jet fountains in the pond was one. Is several areas to sit with benches around the ponds.

TV Garden

The TV Garden was open on Sunday 16th March 2014, and it is usually open about once a month in the afternoon. Although this was the only time I went around it. It was formerly used by ATV and Central TV in the past.

View of some greenhouses.

Close up to the three greenhouses in the wonderful sunshine.

Small pond with an abstract sculpture in it.

Decking over a sandy beach leading to a beach hut.

This area was taped off as there was a sprinkler watering the plants.

Triangular sculptures and  a small palm tree.

A wet patch, or another pond.

Beyond the pond, on the right was a green shipping container. Daffodils in the background.

2015

During the summer of 2015, The Big Hoot 2015 owl sculpture trail was on around Birmingham, and that included Kings Heath. Was two owls in the park, one big one, and a Little Hoot owl in the tea room. I saw them during August 2015.

Outside was Blodeuwedd by the artist Guy McKinley. The sponsor was Wild in Art (who runs these trails all over the country / world).

As close up look at Blodeuwedd.

The back of Blodeuwedd. I only really got this one from the side.

Inside of the tea room at Kings Heath House was the Big Hoot's Little Hoot owl was Annie's Owl by Vinnie the Coach. Vinnie illustrates how The Little Hoot can be used as a device to enable young people of all ages to achieve their Arts Award. He takes inspiration from acclaimed Birmingham writer Benjamin Zephaniah's poem Nature Trail and visual influence from Vincent van Gogh. The sculpture is in memory of local resident Matt Kendall and will be a permanent monument for the Foundation set up in his honour.

The Big Hoot website that was up in 2015 is no longer online sadly. But has been saved / archived on the Wayback Machine. The Big Sleuth in 2017 did not have a trail around Kings Heath, which was a bit disappointing.

2016

Just one photo of Kings Heath Park taken on my then smartphone camera during May 2016. There was warm sunny weather at the time. Just up the path from the Vicarage Road. I think I sat on a bench to have a sandwich. The view towards the playground.

2017

This view of red tulips seen from the 11A bus on the Vicarage Road, passing Kings Heath Park during April 2017.

In August 2017 this gate at the corner of Vicarage Road and Avenue Road was temporarily closed as a precautionary measure. It was probably to stop travellers driving their caravans into the park and setting up an illegal camp.

Again sat on a park bench in Kings Heath Park, in a view similar to the one from a year before. This time as well as the playground, you could see the spire of All Saints Church.

My next proper walk in Kings Heath Park was during the autumn of October 2017. This was the start of a walk along the path near Avenue Road towards a bus stop on the Pershore Road in Selly Park.

A nice floral display around these bushes and trees.

Leaves all over the lawn near the playground, not far from Avenue Road.

Leaves falling off the trees. This relatively new looking tree had yellow leaves coming down.

Saw a squirrel near one of the trees on the grass near all the leaves.

2018

A quick visit in February 2018. There was scaffolding on the School of Horticultural Training - Kings Heath House.

This view of the scaffolding from the pond side.

Crocuses seen above the grass.

My next visit was during April 2018. It was a nice sunny day, and I popped into Kings Heath Park before walking down Avenue Road, Dad's Lane and Moor Green Lane, before going into the Holders Lane & Pebble Mills Fields (rear entrance of Cannon Hill Park).

Got some decent photos of the water jet fountains in the pond.

Zooming in past the water jet fountain to the ducks.

Red and yellow coloured flowers seen on the woodland walk.

This tree hadn't yet had it's leaves grow back at the time.

White daffodils with orange parts in the middle.

Yellow daffodils on the hill near Avenue Road. Just before passing the Camp Hill Line railway bridge.

Caught this squirrel before I headed down Dad's Lane.

Another walk around Kings Heath Park, this time during October 2018. This was from one of the times where I had a coffee at Coffee#1 then walked down to the park for a photo walk.

A dog being walked on a leash.

More autumnal trees with leaves on the ground on the side near Avenue Road.

There was a lot of leaves on the ground around these purple coloured flowers.

More leaves on the ground around one of the paths.

Saw these sheds / garages that I hadn't noticed on previous visits to the park.

Close to one of the car parks was this small rock garden with summery trees.

For my photos from November 2018 please check out my post here: Raining at Kings Heath Park in late November 2018.

2019

For my April 2019 photos please check out this post here: Kings Heath Park over the Easter Bank Holiday Weekend 2019

My last walk to date walking around Kings Heath Park was in October 2019. Again a walk after having a coffee at Coffee#1.

This time getting some new photos close up of the playground since my original photos back in 2012.

Saw some orange berries on a tree.

I thought that the play equipment was new, but it's probably the same ones that I've always seen in this playground.

As with other City parks, they have the yellow playground sign here. Welcome to Kings Heath Park Play Area. (of course now during the lockdown it is closed while the park is open).

This slide is the exact same one that I took in 2012, but from the other side. When I used the slides and swings here in the mid 1980s, the equipment was different and there wasn't a perimeter fence around the playground. The benches in the park back then were also different.

Another dog going for walk, this one didn't have a leash on (it's owner would have been nearby).

Another squirrel running across the grass with leaves everywhere.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Now at 1,100 followers. Thank you.

Birmingham We Are People with Passion award winner 2020

 

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70 passion points
Green open spaces
06 Apr 2020 - Elliott Brown
Inspiration

Edgbaston Reservoir in Ladywood over the years

The last time I had a walk round Edgbaston Reservoir (well half of it) was about a month before lockdown. But I have been many times to the reservoir in Ladywood over the years. Sometimes I walk the full lap, sometimes half. It was originally known as the Rotton Park Reservoir. Originally a small pool called the Rock Pool. Enlarged by Thomas Telford for the Birmingham Canal Navigations.

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Edgbaston Reservoir in Ladywood over the years





The last time I had a walk round Edgbaston Reservoir (well half of it) was about a month before lockdown. But I have been many times to the reservoir in Ladywood over the years. Sometimes I walk the full lap, sometimes half. It was originally known as the Rotton Park Reservoir. Originally a small pool called the Rock Pool. Enlarged by Thomas Telford for the Birmingham Canal Navigations.


Some history about the Edgbaston Reservoir from Wikipedia.

Located in Ladywood, Birmingham, the reservoir was originally called the Rotton Park Reservoir and on early maps as the Rock Pool Reservoir. Between 1824-29 Thomas Telford expanded the pool to supply water to the Birmingham Canal Navigations for the Birmingham and Wolverhampton Levels, as he was straightening out James Brindley's old canal. This became the Birmingham Canal Navigations New Mainline. The Icknield Port Loop is close to the dam at the reservoir.

These days the reservoir is used for leisure, there is a path all the way around for walking, cycling and for dog walkers. The reservoir is also used for rowing and sailing. The Midland Sailing Club is also based at Edgbaston Reservoir. From April 2019, the car parks were closed off to vehicles due to anti-social behaviour.

 

2011

My first visit to Edgbaston Reservoir was during May 2011. So the water looked nice and blue at the time. I went in the main entrance from Reservoir Road. And probably headed to the left around the reservoir in a clockwise direction.

The trees were lush and green as some pigeons flew by.

A tree here was just a stump, and it looked like the reservoir was receding at bit, like a beach.

Some nice shadows from the trees.

Hard to believe that this was all man made in the 19th century.

From here you can see the dam and the skyline, from here the BT Tower was visible.

Can just about make out the Edgbaston Waterworks Tower from here.

The main entrance to the resevoir from Reservoir Road, and to the left was The Tower Dancing & Banqueting Suite (now closed down but open at the time).

2014

My second visit was during February 2014. The conditions was windy and blustery with choppy water. Again approaching from the Reservoir Road main entrance. So perfect weather for sailing or canoeing.

Plenty of cars in the car park at the time (it would be open for another 5 years).

This time I could see sailors in yachts in the reservoir. Perfect conditions for sailing.

This one had a sail with the code: GBR 11224.

This sailor has 4186.

This pair had E GBR 22901.

Several yachts seen sailing here.

This one in a canoe with a sail.

This canoeist had 133256. The spire of St Augustine's Church was behind.

Three people in a speedboat marked MSC, Joan.

2018

My third visit was during July 2018 during the summer heatwave. There was a drought at the time and all the grass all over the City had gone yellow. The reservoir around the edges was looking quite dry. This time I got into the reservoir from the Rotton Park Road entrance at the back.

It was a bit like a beach, the grass was dry and the trees were green, but was very hot.

The reservoir had lost a lot of water during this dry spell. There should be water on the parts that look like dry soil beaches.

Birmingham skyline view behind the dam. Including the BT Tower and Three Snowhill was under construction at the time.

Just look at this poor heron near the edge of the reservoir. Was also a fish struggling for water when it should have been below it!

The western edge of the Reservoir with the skyline above the dam. It was looking quite green in the parts not covered with water.

This could be like a beach right here in Birmingham, but the ground was not find sand. And you shouldn't really sit on the edges. Picnics are probably done in the summer of the grassy parts.

I don't think I've seen the reservoir like this before or since. Once it started raining again, it probably filled back up and went back to normal. Another dam / skyline view.

Even this corner near the dam was dry and lacking reservoir water. After this I left the reservoir via the main Reservoir Road entrance and walked towards Broadway Plaza.

2020

This was during February 2020, a walk that started in Harborne. Got onto the Edgbaston Reservoir again at Rotton Park Road. Since my last visit they had laid new tarmac paths and the water level had gone back to normal.

View towards the Midland Sailing Club.

The nice new tarmaced path, this was during the period after the storms, so the path was a bit wet. Ahead was a person running.

Several cyclists doing laps around the reservoir. This was before social distancing measures.

Over the dam could just see some residential tower blocks.

I only walked halfway around the reservoir this time.

It was looking full of water and in better condition than the drought of 2 years before.

Saw this Great cormorant sitting on a branch of a tree that was in the water.

Gulls flying about over the reservoir like they do.

At the Midland Sailing Club was yacht 3530 and the speedboat MSC, with the name Joan.

One last look at the reservoir. At the time I didn't know why the car park was empty, then saw that the barrier at the Reservoir Road entrance was closed.

After this I continued my walk via the new Ladywood Leisure Centre into the City Centre (don't think I want to do a Harborne via Edgbaston Reservoir to City Centre walk again was too long). Might be a while before I can come back here, so enjoy my photos from my four visits over 2011, 2014, 2018 and 2020.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Now at 1,100 followers. Thank you.

Birmingham We Are People with Passion award winner 2020

 

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60 passion points
Green open spaces
02 Apr 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Perry Park home of the Alexander Stadium in Perry Barr

Perry Park is located in Perry Barr. It is the home of the Alexander Stadium where over the years the British Grand Prix has been held each summer a long with the Diamond League meet. The Tame Valley Canal runs past to the northern edge of the park. Perry Reservoir is also in the park. The M6 motorway is to the east. Between Walsall Road and Aldridge Road.

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Perry Park home of the Alexander Stadium in Perry Barr





Perry Park is located in Perry Barr. It is the home of the Alexander Stadium where over the years the British Grand Prix has been held each summer a long with the Diamond League meet. The Tame Valley Canal runs past to the northern edge of the park. Perry Reservoir is also in the park. The M6 motorway is to the east. Between Walsall Road and Aldridge Road.


Perry Park

The park has a 2 kilometre walking route. In 2012 a BMX track was built for the BMX World Championships. It is the home of the Birmingham BMX Club. They were established in 2009. The park is best known for the Alexander Stadium. It is used for International Athletics and it is home of the world-famous Birchfield Harriers Athletics Club. The stadium will be converted for the Birmingham 2022 Commonwealth Games. Increasing the capacity from 17,000 (as it is now) to 20,000.

The park is located between the Walsall Road and Aldridge Road in Perry Barr. The M6 motorway is to the eastern side of the park.

 

2012

When I went to Perry Park back in August 2012, it was mainly to see the Birmingham Alexander Stadium from the outside. I got the train up to Perry Barr at the time and walked up the Walsall Road. It was a few days before the Aviva Grand Prix. This sign for the Alexander Stadium was on the corner of the Walsall Road with Church Road in Perry Barr.

Some kind of weather or wind reader (I think). Close to the Walsall Road. I think I must have continued up the road looking at things to do with the (then) upcoming Aviva Grand Prix, then entered the park at Perry Park Crescent.

This sign for the Birmingham Alexander Stadium was off the Walsall Road. The entrance to the stadium is this way.

The view of the park from behind the stadium. The lawn up to the trees that line the Tame Valley Canal. Not far from the Perry Park Crescent entrance.

The back of the Alexander Stadium as it was in 2012. I must have entered the park at Perry Park Crescent.

Continuing past the Alexander Stadium, hard to see much of the stadium from up here.

The grass had probably just been cut at the time. This was close to the northern edge of the park near the Tame Valley Canal.

The car park near the Alexander Stadium. These buildings are the GMAC (Gymnastics and Martial Arts Centre).

Trees near the southern edge of the Alexander Stadium.

Saw this Birmingham Alexander Stadium sign. For Car Park's B and C. Not far from Church Road.

The playground in the park near Church Road.

Trees in Perry Park from Church Road.

More trees in Perry Park from Church Road as I headed to the Aldridge Road (to find the old bridge and check out the Perry Barr BCU campus when it was still there at the time).

This road from Church Road had a gated barrier in the way. You can see the Alexander Stadium in the distance from here. Was also banners there for the Aviva Grand Prix.

A zoom in to the most modern stand at the Alexander Stadium (as it was in 2012). Hopefully the stadium will be rebuilt for the Birmingham 2022 Commonwealth Games (hope the lockdown doesn't delay things too much in 2020).

Saw this rusted Birmingham City Council sign from Church Road. The playing of golf is not permitted on this site.

I did not get any more photos of the park in 2012 as I then went down the Aldridge Road to first see the old bridge over the River Tame. So I missed the skatepark and the BMX track. In 2014 I went to the Boar's Head, but it was quite dark when I left, but got a bus back to the City Centre near there (just beyond the M6 overpass).

2018

In April 2018, I was back in Perry Barr for a walk along the Tame Valley Canal. And saw these views of Perry Park (I did not go in). The Birmingham Skyline was visible behind these buildings. Probably the back of the GMAC (Gymnastics and Martial Arts Centre).

This was only view from the Tame Valley Canal of Perry Park that wasn't hidden by the trees. It's close to a path into the park.

Trees obsuring the view of the Alexander Stadium from the Tame Valley Canal, but a better view of the stadium than I had 6 years earlier.

As you can see with the trees from the canal, it was a bit hard to see the Alexander Stadium. But if they rebuild the stadium for the Birmingham 2022 Commonwealth Games, there wont be much to see from the canalside.

A view from the Tame Valley Canal of the Perry Reservoir. I need to one day come back and walk around that (after the lockdown ends, will be a long while off before I'm able to go back).

Another view of the modern stand at the Alexander Stadium, this time seen from the Tame Valley Canal.

There was these steps down from the Tame Valley Canal into Perry Park which would lead to the Perry Reservoir. But as I was on a canal walk, I didn't get off the canal until I got to College Road.

I finished my Tame Valley Canal Walk at College Road and walked down to the bus stop not far from the Boar's Head. And didn't think about popping into the park or getting photos of the BMX track or skatepark (at the time). Will need to go back to Perry Park in the future (during lockdown this is not possible). Would be nice to walk around Perry Reservoir sometime in the future, when it is safe again to travel up there.

Bus routes nearby include the 33, 51 and 52.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Now at 1,100 followers. Thank you.

Birmingham We Are People with Passion award winner 2020

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60 passion points
Green open spaces
31 Mar 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Kings Norton Park down the Pershore Road South

While I've been to Kings Norton many times over the years, I've only had one proper walk into Kings Norton Park way back in 2011. Back in 2009 I passed it on the way down the Pershore Road South to Kings Norton Village. And only skimmed it from Westhill Road in 2016. The park is down the hill from Kings Norton Station and Cotteridge. There is a Recreation Ground opposite.

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Kings Norton Park down the Pershore Road South





While I've been to Kings Norton many times over the years, I've only had one proper walk into Kings Norton Park way back in 2011. Back in 2009 I passed it on the way down the Pershore Road South to Kings Norton Village. And only skimmed it from Westhill Road in 2016. The park is down the hill from Kings Norton Station and Cotteridge. There is a Recreation Ground opposite.


Kings Norton Park

This park is located down on the Pershore Road South in Kings Norton, between Kings Norton Station and Cotteridge to the north and the old Kings Norton village to the south. Westhill Road is to the west while Camp Lane is to the north. You can also approach the park from Wychall Lane, and is on the no 45 and 47 bus routes.

There is a group called the Friends of Kings Norton Park. A group of local volunteers who come together to improve and protect the park and neighbour playing fields. (There blog has not been updated since 2014).

There is a 2 kilometre walking route in the park, as well as a skatepark and a playground. The River Rea flows to the northern edge of the park. National Cycle Network route number 5 passes through the park, and it is also part of the Rea Valley Route.

 

2009

My first indirect photos of Kings Norton Park were taken on a walk down the Pershore Road South. Starting in Bournville, then passing Cotteridge and going down to the old Kings Norton village. This was when I started taking photos around Birmingham during April 2009.

Some views of the River Rea. There is at least two bridges on the Pershore Road South, so the first bigger one is definitely the River Rea. The other smaller bridge crosses an unnamed stream.

Another view of the River Rea or an unnamed stream. This was 11 years ago, so I can't remember which bridge I took them from.

The main path into Kings Norton Park with a pair of long paths, with flower beds on the grass in the middle.

2011

My walk near the end of June 2011 through Kings Norton Park was my first proper walk around the park. Starting on Westhill Road. This is probably the River Rea (I used to think it was an unnamed stream).

The main entrance on Westhill Road is similar to that on the Pershore Road South, they look identical. A pair of paths with flower beds in the middle of the lawn.

The playground near the Westhill Road entrance to the park is also near a car park. (obviously during our current situation the playground is now closed). This was some kind of curved climbing frame for kids.

Still in the playground, not sure what this is, with a pair of steps. Can't see if it has a slide. The view was towards the spire of St Nicholas's Church.

Two pairs of swings in the playground.

This was the slide in the playground here.

Now over the the skatepark area of Kings Norton Park.

The skatepark had many ramps for skateboarders and BMX bike riders to do crazy tricks on.

It had graffiti all over it.

Was loads of different sections of the skatepark with barriers at the higher levels.

This was the lower section of the skatepark.

Now onto a path with the trees mostly to the left.

More trees as I got closer to the Pershore Road South.

An old stone bench, which was off one of the paths from the main Pershore Road South entrance.

Saw this wooden post. Sponsored by Birmingham City Council. Would assume it was installed by the Friends of Kings Norton Park. Possibly from some kind of floral trail?

There was this dirt path through a pair of brick and stone gate posts, not far from the Pershore Road South entrance. I have never walked up here (I don't think).

No path behind these brick and stone gateposts, just overgrown bushes (at the time).

2016

Passed nearby again briefly back in February 2016. Again from Westhill Road, but this time I found some steps near the south west corner of the park. You can see the playground in the distance to the left. I started a walk from Kings Norton village from The Green and ended up going up Westhill Road.

A look at the steps from Westhill Road. I did not go up these steps, or go into the park this time around.

A cycling sign seen from Westhill Road outside of the park. The pavement is only on the left, not pavement on the right (if you are heading up to Camp Lane).

Yellow and purple crocuses seen on the grass just outside of Kings Norton Park.

The crocuses were on the roadside of the lawn, separated by the park barrier.

Another look at the River Rea from Westhill Road, before I walked up Camp Lane to the Pershore Road South.

I keep thinking I already had the photos in past years, so find it hard to find something new to take in Kings Norton. I wont be able to return again until the lockdown ends. It's been well over a year since I last got several buses to Kings Norton. Including when I last walked up the Stratford-on-Avon Canal to Kings Norton Junction. And even on those visits, never thought about going into Kings Norton Park again (the canal walk ended at the Kings Norton Recreation Ground and it was raining at the time).

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Now at 1,100 followers. Thank you.

Birmingham We Are People with Passion award winner 2020

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60 passion points
History & heritage
30 Mar 2020 - Elliott Brown
Inspiration

National Trust properties in the Cotswolds: Snowshill Manor and Hidcote Manor (Summer 2019)

While all National Trust properties and gardens are now closed, we look back to my visits in the Summer of 2019 to a pair of properties in the Cotswolds (Gloucestershire). In July 2019 we went to Snowshill Manor (not far from Broadway in Worcestershire) and the last National Trust property we went to was at Hidcote Manor near the end of August 2019. Both had eccentric owners in the 20th C.

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National Trust properties in the Cotswolds: Snowshill Manor and Hidcote Manor (Summer 2019)





While all National Trust properties and gardens are now closed, we look back to my visits in the Summer of 2019 to a pair of properties in the Cotswolds (Gloucestershire). In July 2019 we went to Snowshill Manor (not far from Broadway in Worcestershire) and the last National Trust property we went to was at Hidcote Manor near the end of August 2019. Both had eccentric owners in the 20th C.


For my last National Trust properties post in the Midlands follow this link: National Trust properties around the Midlands (Spring and Summer 2019).

 

Snowshill Manor

This visit to Snowshill Manor was during July 2019. We passed through Broadway in the car to and from the manor (we would later go back to Broadway in September 2019 on the Gloucestershire Warwickshire Steam Railway).

Some history taken from the Wikipedia page (linked above). Snowshill Manor is a National Trust property located in the village of Snowshill in Gloucestershire. It is best known for it's 20th century owner Charles Paget Wade. The property is a typical Cotswold manor house. It has been Grade II* listed since 1960. Wade gave the house and the contents to the National Trust in 1951.

 

When you arrive in the car park and walk to the entrance, the first thing you would see is the Visitor Reception and Shop. National Trust members can get their cards scanned inside of here.

On the walk to the manor house, you can see this model windmill with toy soldiers. Although I later took it on the way to the cafe later during the visit.

Before we left, we headed to this building to have a coffee. We sat outside. It looks like a traditional Cotswolds type of building. Not sure how old it is though.

First view of Snowshill Manor heading up the path. It is a Grade II* listed building Snowshill Manor. The manor house dates to the 17th century, with additions in the 18th and 19th centuries. It was altered in 1919-23 by Charles Paget Wade.

The house was made of Coursed squared sandstone with a stone slate roof. There was timed entrances to the house, so we didn't go in at this point. This was my first view head on of the house.

Another view from within the gate. Above the main entrance is the Sambach coat of arms.

Getting a view of Snowshill Manor behind the gate. As this was the view that Charles Paget Wade saw in a magazine called Country Life which was advertising it for sale in June 1916.

After our visit to the other buildings and a look around the gardens we eventually got to have a full look around the inside of the house, where you could see many of the objects that Charles Paget Wade had collected during his time here. In this room was one of the model ships that he owned.

A pair of large candlesticks with a bust of a man in the middle with a ruff.

This darkened room had Ancient Japanese armour. Like Samurai warriors or something.

Upstairs to the attic, and there was loads of bicycles in this space. As well as another model windmill.

Back downstairs and this room had loads of masks in open drawers. Was also some swords on the wall on the left.

This room had rifles on the wall on the right. Also some shields, a tall hat and a pair of boots. There was much more than this to see, this is just a highlight of the collection in the house. Wade probably didn't live in this house with his collection.

This was the Priest's House and Workshop. It was in this building that Charles Paget Wade actually lived. At the time I couldn't get the full exterior in one photo due to the amount of people in the way. It is a Grade II listed building Brewhouse, in Garden, Adjoining Snowshill Manor. It was built in the 16th and 17th centuries with extensions in the 19th century. Wade made changed in 1919-23. Made of Squared stone in courses with a slate roof. You could go up the stairs to see the contents inside.

What looks like to be Wade's kitchen table. With objects on shelves and on the steps.

Loads more objects on this side including a pair of chairs. Lots of swords and pikes hanging from the ceiling by the looks of it. Near a fireplace.

This was the interior of the Priest's House. A statue on the right near an alter. A desk and a chair on the left.

Outside you can see a model village in the gardens. It is of Wolf's Cove. Wade started building the village in 1907 when he lived in Hampstead. When he moved to Snowshill in 1919, he brought the models with him and by the 1920's had started to create the model Cornish fishing village of Wolf's Cove. National Trust volunteers and staff started to recreate it from 2010 onwards. The model train returned in 2018.

Located in the Well Court was this clock with doors. Latin inscriptions on both sides. I am doing this post after the clocks went forward again to British Summer Time. It is also like a Zodiac with the stars on it.

The other side of the Well Court. There was a small pond here, be careful not to fall in! The building is Grade II listed Two Gardenhouses, About 8 Metres North of Dovecote, Snowshill Manor. They were former cowhouses now Garden Houses. Dated to the late 18th century and early to mid 19th century. Probably altered from 1919 to 1923 by Charles Paget Wade. Walls made of Random rubble with a slate roof. There was a further area to look at through the door, but you have to duck down to get through and look where you are going.

Distance from Birmingham: well over an hour via the A435 and A46. Postcode is WR12 7JU. About 38 miles away. During the lockdown / pandemic period we are in it is temporarily closed. So glad we got to go last summer. National Trust website: Snowshill Manor and Garden.

Hidcote Manor

This visit to Hidcote Manor Garden was during the August Bank Holiday Weekend in late August 2019. After we went here, we went to Kiftsgate Court Gardens again in the afternoon. Was my fisit visit back to Kiftsgate in about 9 years (but that is for another post).

Some history taken from the Wikipedia page (link above). Hidcote Manor Garden is a garden located in the village of Hidcote Bartrim near Chipping Campden in Gloucestershire (part of the Cotswolds). The American Lawrence Johnston and his mother settled in the UK in the early 20th century, and he immediately became a British citizen and fought in the British army during the Boer war. In 1907 his mother purchased the Hidcote Manor Estate. Johnston became interested in developing the garden which he started doing in 1910. After World War II he spent most of his time at his property in the South of France, so he entrusted Hidcote to the National Trust in 1947.

 

Just before the visitor centre, I spotted this farm. It is called Manor Farm (Righton). It was not too far from the Barn Cafe.

This view of Hidcote Manor and the Former Chapel (to the left) was from the plant sales area behind the Barn Cafe. The chapel is Grade II listed Former Chapel at Hidcote Manor. Was a former barn, later a chapel. Dated to the 18th century, converted in the 20th century to a chapel by Lawrence Johnston. Made of ashlar and limestone.

Later near the end of my visit, I popped into the chapel. Saw several stained glass windows like this one. Was also an exhibition in here that didn't really interest me.

First look at Hidcote Manor from the plant sales area just beyond the Barn Cafe and toilets. You head out of this area and into the courtyard to get to the house and chapel. The gift shop was the building to the right (just out of shot).

The first full view of Hidcote Manor from the inner courtyard. It is a Grade II listed building Hidcote Manor. Was a former farmhouse. Dates to the late 17th century, which was refronted in the 18th century. With more alterations in the early 20th century. Made of ashlar limestone with a tiled roof.

Only a few rooms on the ground floor were open to explore. This was the library with a fireplace and desk.

In the living room was some comfy chairs near a fireplace.

To the side was a cards table with chairs.

Back outside of the house. This view was from the East Court.

This view of Hidcote Manor was from the Old Garden. Almost hidden by the trees.

I later saw this view of the house, not far from Mrs Winthrop's Cafe. Didn't have a coffee here, as we later had a drink at Kiftsgate Court instead (I later had a cola).

Now for an explore around Lawrence Johnston's gardens. The White Garden in the Old Garden. Steps between the bushes.

Red Borders and the Gazebos. This area was roped off so had to fins another way to that pair of buildings near the steps. The Gazebos was Grade II listed buildings Two Gazebos and Attached Walls, Railings and Steps at Hidcote Manor Gardens. They date to the early 20th century. Made of Squared limestone. Decorated by Lawrence Johnston.

I later saw another view of the Gazebos. And you can walk through one of them. The other one had plates and a surface for making sandwiches or something, like Johnston had it set up for picnics on the lawns somewhere.

This is in the Bathing Pool Garden. It features a statue installed in 1930 of a boy and a dolphin. Was a fountain.

View of the Italian Shelter. Was built in the 1910s. Has some benches to sit on. Was also Italian style or Roman style statues in there, and wall paintings.

This was in the Central Stream Garden. All these gardens were looking nice in the later summer period.

On the way out of the gardens I saw the Alpine Terrace. It runs parallel to the Stilt Garden. There is an urn at the end.

To the back of the house was Mrs Winthrop's Cafe. As mentioned above we didn't stop to have a drink here. The cafe was to the right, while the gardens, toilet, shop and exit were to the left.

Distance from Birmingham: an hour via the M42 and M40 (SatNav takes you through Stratford-upon-Avon). About 47 miles away. Postcode is GL55 6LR. During the lockdown / pandemic period we are in it is temporarily closed. So glad we got to go last summer. National Trust website: Hidcote.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

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Birmingham We Are People with Passion award winner 2020

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