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Green open spaces
30 Mar 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Oaklands Recreation Ground in South Yardley over the years

The Oaklands Recreation Ground is a large park between South Yardley and Hay Mills. And is close to the Swan Island, Coventry Road and Church Road. Also opposite the Swan Centre (with the big Tesco Extra). I've walked around here several times over the years. Even when covered in snow and it was freezing cold! In recent years the parkland has been done up. Also nice skyline views.

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Oaklands Recreation Ground in South Yardley over the years





The Oaklands Recreation Ground is a large park between South Yardley and Hay Mills. And is close to the Swan Island, Coventry Road and Church Road. Also opposite the Swan Centre (with the big Tesco Extra). I've walked around here several times over the years. Even when covered in snow and it was freezing cold! In recent years the parkland has been done up. Also nice skyline views.


The Oaklands Recreation Ground is a large parkland located in South Yardley and near Hay Mills in Birmingham. Not far from the Swan Island and the Coventry Road, A45. The semi circle road altered for the rebuilding of the Swan Centre, Church Road passes the park to the east. While Hob Moor Road is to the north and Holder Road to the west.

Nearby bus routes include the 11A, 11C, 60, X1 and X2 from National Express West Midlands.

Improvement works took place here until 2017 (which included Phase 4 that year). There is paths for walking or running, a new outdoor gym, playgrounds and a skatepark.

For skyline lovers, on a clear day you can see the Birmingham Skyline from here.

 

Over the years, I have popped into this park or recreation ground several times. One year there was snow there and it was very cold, so wasn't there long (and headed to the Costa in the Swan Centre to warm up).

 

2013

I usually get in from the Church Road semi circle road in South Yardley. My first visit was during December 2013. There is a pathed entrance near here. Not far from the 11A bus stop and Tesco petrol station.

This view towards a pair of Gas Holders. Probably the Nechells Gas Holders (or Saltley).

One of my early Birmingham skyline photos from the Oaklands Recreation Ground. Here you can see The Cube, The Sentinels and the Beetham Tower.

Football goalposts. Would assume that the park was in it's early phases of improvements at this point in time.

The path at the other Church Road exit. If you enter or exit here, you are opposite Yardley Primary School.

In this view, I got the skyline of Birmingham with the lawn and paths in the Recreation Ground. From the Beetham Tower to the Rotunda. The Hyatt Hotel and Alpha Tower are in the middle of this view.

 

2017

My second visit to the Oaklands Recreation Ground with my camera was during October 2017. By then the improvement works were well under way and were due to be finished by December 2017. As before entered the path from Church Road opposite the Swan Centre. Path to the right, but I headed to the left.

The path to the left that I followed down the hill. You can see that they weren't quite finished with the improvement works here at the time.

A set of swings.

This view towards Bakeman House and Equipoint. A residential block of flats above the Swan Centre near Tesco Extra that was refurbished when the Swan Centre was rebuilt. Equipoint was offices, but for years they struggled to let them, so now they are being converted into flats or apartments (or they were before the lockdown came into force).

View towards The Vibe. A youth centre on Holders Road.

New sculpted gates at the exit to Holders Road. The design of animals on flowers by the looks of it.

The path to the left leads to the Coventry Road, while the path to the right leads to Holders Road. I headed to the Coventry Road this time around.

Getting close to the Coventry Road entrance / exit. The brick walls and gates had yet to be built at this point.

 

2018

Would you believe it that during March 2018, there was snow and ice in the Oaklands Recreation Ground. This was during the weather event known as The Beast from the East 2. It felt like -15°C but was probably more like -3°C. This was the height restriction barrier in the car park near Boughton Road.

It was as cold as it looks! Snow and ice everywhere. Bollards and the new railings were ahead of me.

Another look at one of the new gates. Nice sculpted design on this one.

The grass poking just above the snow, but still looks like it could be in Antarctica or something. So so cold. My hands and feet were freezing. Had to keep putting my gloves back on.

Tried to get as many snow photos as I could before heading to the Swan Centre for a warm coffee in Costa.

Getting close to Tesco Extra and the Swan Centre. Saw this climbing frame, probably part of the outdoor gym set. No one would be using it in these conditions.

The middle of March 2018 and the leaves hadn't yet grown back on the trees. View of Equipoint.

Heading out of the Oaklands Recreation Ground onto Church Road. View of the Tesco Extra petrol station and Equipoint.

By April 2018, the snow of the month before was a distant memory. The new brick gate posts on the Coventry Road was complete along with new railings either side of it.

There was also this brick wall around the oak sculpture. Also the daffodils had finished flowering.

I didn't go into the Oaklands Recreation Ground this time, just saw in passing probably heading to the X1, X2 or 60 bus stop on the Coventry Road. The Oaklands sign looks nice don't you think? The gateposts also had a pair of oak sculptures on them. Was done as part of the Queen Elizabeth II Field - Fields in Trust. Diamond Jubilee 2012.

 

2019

The first of my three visits here was during January 2019. A look at one of the new playgrounds.

An outdoor gym seen from the path coming from the Coventry Road, which I assume is now the main entrance to the Recreation Ground.

My second visit in 2019 was during October 2019. View of the Birmingham skyline, while the trees looked autumnal. 103 Colmore Row was rising to the left. With the BT Tower in the middle.

This view towards The Cube and The Sentinels with The Bank Tower 2 seen behind.

From this path you can see the skatepark with the skyline behind.

Saw this stone with the Queen Elizabeth II plaques. I had previously seen it a few years before with no plaques on it. But on this visit I did not get too close to them, so I had to return to see them again a few months later.

Another City Skyline view from the Recreation Ground with the houses near Holders Road below.

Another view of one of the new playgrounds towards Holiday Inn Express. Also known as the Holders Road Play Area as I discovered when I returned on Boxing Day 2019.

Third and final visit in 2019 was on Boxing Day near the end of December 2019. Mainly to get close to that i stone with the Queen Elizabeth II plaques. Saw this yellow swing thing in one of the playgrounds.

The Holders Road Play Area empty on Boxing Day 2019. All playgrounds in the cities parks are now closed during the lockdown while the parks remain open.

Saw this sign close up in the design of an oak leaf. This is where I saw the Holders Road Play Area name.

Going past the skatepark. It was pretty quiet here on Boxing Day.

Another set of swings with a lime green bar at the top. Also saw a magpie.

The outdoor gym equipment on Boxing Day. These will now also be out of use during the lockdown we now find ourselves in.

Finally got up and close to the stone with the plaques. The top one was the Queen Elizabeth II Fields in Trust Diamond Jubilee 2012 plaque. The bottom one was the blue plaque stating that the Oaklands Recreation Ground was awarded Fields in Trust status in 2014 in recognition of the site's importance to the local community, and so it will be protected for generations to come. The boulder represents the strength and durabilty that working in partnership can bring, resulting in a better and sustainable future for all.

Back to the path leading to the gates at Coventry Road and heading to the 11C bus stop near Yardley Primary School. Buses are now reduced during the lockdown, and can't use them again until the lockdown is over.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Now at 1,100 followers. Thank you.

Birmingham We Are People with Passion award winner 2020

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Green open spaces
26 Mar 2020 - Elliott Brown
Inspiration

Ley Hill Park up the hill in Northfield

For this green spaces / park post, we go back to early April 2017, when I went up to Ley Hill Park in Northfield. Starting at the Starbucks Drive Thru in Northfield, I went up Vineyard Road past Bellfield Junior School. The park was at the top of the hill. It's part of the Merritt's Brook Greenway, with a path heading to Manor Farm Park.

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Ley Hill Park up the hill in Northfield





For this green spaces / park post, we go back to early April 2017, when I went up to Ley Hill Park in Northfield. Starting at the Starbucks Drive Thru in Northfield, I went up Vineyard Road past Bellfield Junior School. The park was at the top of the hill. It's part of the Merritt's Brook Greenway, with a path heading to Manor Farm Park.


During the lock down and the one form of exercise a day, I can only walk to the closest parks in walking distance. I don't know how many weeks or months this will last for. With many places closed down. But parks are open (playgrounds are not). So please continue to enjoy my virtual park visits from my actual past visits (if you can). And maybe once things goes back to normal after the virus crisis ends, we will all be able to enjoy parks and visit the places we used to be able to.

 

Here we will go back about 3 years to a visit to Ley Hill Park in Northfield when it was OK at the time to get the bus or train.

The then new Starbucks Drive Thru in Northfield first opened around April 2017 and during my visit there, was thinking of somewhere to go. I could see a park up the hill nearby (also by checking Google Maps). Plus this walk would lead me towards Manor Farm Park and near the no 61 and 63 bus routes when I left.

 

The entrance to Ley Hill Park. Heading through a green space near Vineyard Road. I crossed over Merritt's Brook Lane and into the park. Welcome to Ley Hill Park.

The path into the park towards a footbridge that crosses the Merritt's Brook.

A look at one side of the Merritt's Brook. Looks like the routes of the tree on the right grows quite close to the brook.

A pair of paths. A third one makes a triangle.

I must have taken the right path by the looks of it.

Following one of the paths past the trees. The Merritt's Brook is to the right, and this was near the bottom of the park.

The path continues as the trees make shadows on the path and lawns. The fields to the left don't really have gravel paths to walk up to.

A pair of trees in the middle of the hilly field in the park.

The path leading to Merritt's Hill and the exit gates.

Another exit to Merritt's Hill. Hadn't really finished looking around Ley Hill Park at this point.

To head up the hill, I followed the mown grass paths up the hill.

Saw this robin but only got it from the back at the time.

Near the top of the hill and there was nice views of the Northfield and surrounding areas from up here.

Top of the hill. An zoom in's could see the local school and towards the tallest building on the Northfield High Street (Bristol Road South).

Heading to the next area. Here the bushes forms a triangular shape (which makes more sense if you look at the Satellite view on Google Maps).

Now for a pair of dirt paths near the trees.

There was more grass paths near the top end of the park.

This tree stump was lying on the ground up here.

Another exit gate to Merritt's Hill, this one was also near Clun Road.

One more look at the park from the top. Views not so visible from up here though.

Just outside of Ley Hill Park was a green space near Merritt's Hill. Starting at Clun Road going down to Meadow Brook Road.

I headed down Merritt's Hill via this green area. Which at this point led down to Meadow Brook Road.

Even from here the shopping centre on the Northfield High Street (Bristol Road South) was visible.

This path was near the houses south of Clun Road. And it takes you down to Meadow Brook Road.

The west view of the green area. Beyond the trees was Ley Hill Park.

Looking up the path I had just walked down from Clun Road.

Getting closer back to the Merritt's Brook Greenway, one last look at the path I went down. Getting back to Merritt's Hill.

There's that side entrance from Ley Hill Park that I saw earlier. Seen from Merritt's Hill.

Going down Merritt's Hill. Brookside was to the left which was near the Merritt's Brook Greenway entrance I was heading to.

And there's that Ley Hill Park entrance I saw earlier. That was on the Merritt's Brook Greenway. Next I took the path in the other direction towards Manor Farm Park.

To see my photos from Manor Farm Park, see my first post on that park here: Manor Farm Park: a park down the Bristol Road South I've always considered to be in Northfield.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Now at 1,100 followers. Thank you.

Birmingham We Are People with Passion award winner 2020

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60 passion points
Green open spaces
25 Mar 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Woodgate Valley Country Park near Quinton

We go back to October 2018 for this visit to Woodgate Valley Country Park, which is near Quinton in South West Birmingham. Getting the no 24 bus from Harborne, was hard to find a way into the park until I got in from Barn Piece. I followed the paths as far as the exit on West Boulevard. The route mostly followed the Bourn Brook.

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Woodgate Valley Country Park near Quinton





We go back to October 2018 for this visit to Woodgate Valley Country Park, which is near Quinton in South West Birmingham. Getting the no 24 bus from Harborne, was hard to find a way into the park until I got in from Barn Piece. I followed the paths as far as the exit on West Boulevard. The route mostly followed the Bourn Brook.


Woodgate Valley Country Park is a country park located between Bartley Green and Quinton in South West Birmingham. It is the third largest country park after Sutton Park and the Lickey Hills Country Park in Birmingham. It was set up in 1984. Having previously been rural land and small holdings.

 

Back in October 2018, I got the no 24 bus from Harborne. Had to keep checking Google Maps until I found an entrance at Barn Piece. I followed the main path towards an exit at West Boulevard. The Bournbrook Walkway goes through this park. Good for walkers, cyclists and dog walkers. I think I later got a no 23 bus back in the direction of Harborne from Northfield Road near California Way (the Bournbrook Walkway continues beyond the park).

 

I initially got close to Woodgate Valley Country Park in December 2016 after my walk around Senneleys Park when I was on Barnes Hill in Bartley Green (close to Weoley Castle), but didn't get around to heading back for an actual walk in the park until about October 2018. It's quite far to travel on a couple of buses. I had previously saw a sign to Woodgate Valley after a walk in December 2015 to see the Weoley Castle ruins.

 

Getting of the no 24 bus in Quinton, I think around Dwellings Lane off Quinton Road West, it was a bit hard to find a way into the park. I kept checking Google Maps until I found a way in at a cul-de-sac called Barn Piece. This is one of the maps of the Woodgate Country Park. There was a "You are here" red dot near the top left corner of the map.

This was the gate to the country park from Barn Piece. Make sure to close it as you go in.

Heading from the path from Barn Piece to the main path, saw this leaf basin. The main path goes to the left.

Onto the main path. Long and straight until it curves to the right.

A crossroads of paths. I took the path towards West Boulevard. Meaning that there was a part of the park I never saw (I missed the Woodgate Valley Urban Farm and the Woodgate Valley County Park Visitors Centre). I have not been back since this visit, and with the current situation in the world, I wont be coming back here any time soon.

This view of the Bourn Brook seen from the path. There is the main path and another path that runs on the other side of the Bourn Brook.

A newly laid surface suitable for cyclists, dog walkers, joggers and walkers. And photographers, not forgetting us! Hold on to the railings if you want to. Or lean your bike on it.

One of the many footbridges over the Bourn Brook. There was also a path on the right that went into the brook.

In this view of the Bourn Brook from the footbridge, there is also a path that goes through the brook. Possibly for horse riders or those on dirt bikes (or normal bicycles).

After crossing over the first footbridge over the Bourn Brook,  I followed a section of the dirt path through this canopy of trees. Still with green leaves in October.

But there was yellow and brown leaves fallen on the dirt path. The Bourn Brook was now to the right.

Another footbridge over the Bourn Brook, of the same design as the other one. Crossing back from the dirth path back to the main path.

As with the other footbridge on the Bourn Brook this one also had a track going into the brook, but on the other side of the bridge. This view of the Bourn Brook with the main path on the left.

Back on the main path now, and saw this area with a bench to the back. Surrounded by trees. Bit like a camp site. Leaves all over the ground. Very autumnal. A woodland area.

A look at the Bourn Brook and the trees all around it.

On the main path to West Boulevard, saw this tree hanging over the path. The leaves here at the time made it look quite autumnal.

Back on the path now heading towards West Boulevard. As you can see it is suitable for all those cyclists that ride their bikes in here.

Another view of the Bourn Brook.

First glimpse of West Boulevard behind this gate. Close to the end of this walk now. Although I didn't exit from this gate.

The exit to West Boulevard. I crossed over at the lights and continued on the next section of the Bourn Brook Walkway. It only took me about 25 minutes to walk from one end of the park to this end.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Now at 1,100 followers. Thank you.

Birmingham We Are People with Passion award winner 2020

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60 passion points
Green open spaces
19 Mar 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Senneleys Park in Bartley Green

This was a visit to Senneleys Park in Bartley Green, during December 2016. Mainly to find a sculpture that I heard about. Got the no 22 bus here (the route no longer exists but there is the X22 elsewhere in Birmingham). Remains of a Pyramid by Avtarjeet Dhanjal was what I came to see. But it was missing a bronze statue or figure.

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Senneleys Park in Bartley Green





This was a visit to Senneleys Park in Bartley Green, during December 2016. Mainly to find a sculpture that I heard about. Got the no 22 bus here (the route no longer exists but there is the X22 elsewhere in Birmingham). Remains of a Pyramid by Avtarjeet Dhanjal was what I came to see. But it was missing a bronze statue or figure.


Senneleys Park is a large green space in south west Birmingham. There is football pitches, an outdoor gym and a BMX track. Large green areas, and a tree lined brook.

In December 2016 I got the no 22 bus to Stonehouse Lane and got into the park from Mill Lane. This is the Bartley Brook.

First look at the playground below an electricity pylon. It was not that far from the Bartley Brook.

One of the old Birmingham City Council - Senneleys Park signs from the Department of Recreation and Community Services. Looking quite worn at the time. It was near Stonehouse Lane.

View of the Bartley Brook with an electricity pylon to the left and a path to walk up on the right.

This path for some reason had these wooden frames as you pass down it. But then again it is also a road for vehicles to go down. Such as cars to the car park, or council park maintenance vehicles. There is at least two car parks in this park.

Slide seen in the Senneleys Park Play Area.

This path is part of the BMX track.

On top of the hill, the grass was a little overgrown here. There are paths that circle this hilly area.

There was another playground in the park called the Senneleys Meadow Play Area. With another slide for kids to use, and this swinging tyre ride thing.

This was what I came to Senneleys Park to see. Remains of a Pyramid by Avtarjeet Dhanjal. It was made around 1989 to 1991. It used to have a bronze statue figure with it, but it either got stolen, or went into storage due to vandalism. The broken pyramid pieces were made from Portland stone, but is quite weathered now after over 25 years. Who knows how it has fared in the years since I last saw it (4 years ago).

Another view of Remains of a Pyramid. The lost statue I think used to be somewhere in the middle between the parts of the pyramid. Wonder what happened to it?

It was a small booklet that I once bought from the Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery that led me to find this sculpture. Public Art in Birmingham (priced only 50p from the BM & AG Gift Shop). There is a photo in the booklet showing the statue leaning against the right side of the pyramid. The booklet says the bronze figure was modelled from a former pupil of nearby Hillcrest School. It was cast by Frank Forster. Near where the Portland stone was discoloured a bit.

Another photo shows Eleonor McFarlane posing with the statue as it was being made. She was the model used by the sculptor Avtarjeet Dhanjal.

Scans taken from the BM & AG booklet Public Art in Birmingham produced in August 1993 by the Birmingham Museums and Art Gallery.

I saw this dead tree in the park.

A gull on the grass.

A crow on the lawn.

One of the paths in the park. A bench to sit on.

 

A footbridge over a path. Close to Senneleys Skate Park.

Welcome to Senneleys Skate Park. The usual ramps and walls with graffiti all over.

A basketball court.

A boarded up building. Not sure what it was used for, but it has had a lot of graffiti on it over the years.

This time I was close to Senneleys Meadow Play Area and got a close up look at the slide as it curved round to the left.

The lawn with trees. A big field seen from a path.

One last look at the large field in Senneleys Park. A view like this could be in the countryside, but it is within the City of Birmingham! And if you look on Google Maps, the park is surrounded by streets of houses.

Took my exit from the park via this car park near Overfield Road. Welcome to Senneleys Park. The max height for cars was 1.95m under this gated entrance.

The park is close to Bartley Reservoir, Woodgate Valley Country Park and Lodge Hill Cemetery. Looking on Google Maps there is some other green spaces to explore (not right now though of course). One green space marked on Google Maps as Green Hill. There is also Old Quarry Park. So many green spaces around Birmingham. One day I might check them out (when everything is back to normal that is).

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Now at 1,100 followers. Thank you.

Birmingham We Are People with Passion award winner 2020

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Art, culture & creativity
18 Mar 2020 - Elliott Brown
Inspiration

From the City Centre Floral Trail to the Big Hoot & Sleuth over the years in St Paul's Square

Every summer during the Birmingham City Centre Floral Trail there used to be certain floral sculptures in St Paul's Square. In the summer of 2015 there was the Big Hoot and in the summer of 2017 there was the Big Sleuth. Here we will look at what was on display from about 2009 to 2019.

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From the City Centre Floral Trail to the Big Hoot & Sleuth over the years in St Paul's Square





Every summer during the Birmingham City Centre Floral Trail there used to be certain floral sculptures in St Paul's Square. In the summer of 2015 there was the Big Hoot and in the summer of 2017 there was the Big Sleuth. Here we will look at what was on display from about 2009 to 2019.


Birmingham City Centre Floral Trail

I started taking photos of the Birmingham City Centre Floral Trail in September 2009 when I spotted Wallace & Gromit on Great Charles Street Queensway from the footbridge. Although didn't see the piece in St Paul's Square until November 2009. Planted Silver Tureen, which seems permenant now, was part of the 2009 Floral Trail.

It represented the Jewellery Quarter, and is of a Planted Silver Tureen. Which was made by Matthew Boulton for Mrs Elizabeth Montagu, a long time friend of his. It was part of a large dinner service. Similar products are still being made in the Jewellery Quarter today. Over 2300 plants have been planted.

It was a mixture of cotton lavender, curry plant and helichcrysum korma. A Christmas tree was out, and you could see the base in the middle that was later used for future Floral Trails and the later Big Hoot and Sleuth trails.

While there was a bit of purple, they had finished flowering by the autumn of 2009.

Seen during July 2011 was Planted Silver Tureen. Which I previously saw in 2009. The middle of July is the best time to see the lavender here in bloom. Looked like the base in the middle had gone (it would be back).

Seen in St Paul's Square during August 2012 was the Paralympian Tennis Player. A wicker sculpture based on Jordanne Whiley and Lucy Shuker. It was the summer of the London 2012 Olympics and Paralympics. And this was obviously based on the Paralympics.

The wicker sculpture of a Paralympian Tennis Player seen from the back. It had red coloured flowers all around the base of it. Before London 2012, Birmingham hosted the American and Jamaican teams who trained at the Alexander Stadium and at the University of Birmingham respectfully.

No wicker sculptures in July 2013 but this was when Birmingham was having visitors from the judges of the Entente Florale Europe competition. Birmingham was chosen to represent the UK by the Royal Horticultural Society, due to it's recent gold wins at various RHS flower shows in recent years. The lavender of previous years was still there, if a bit overgrown. See details further up about this piece known as the Planted Silver Tureen.

Nothing much else to see at the time, so took these bushes and flowers as someone was sunbathing to the left. Note that you can see one or two of the gravestones to the right. But everything was lush and green. I hope the judges liked what they saw all over Birmingham at the time.

The last year of the Birmingham City Centre Floral Trail was in 2014, before the Big Hoot trail a year later in 2015. The theme for 2014 was to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the outbreak of World War One in 1914. The British Victory Medal was a wicker sculpture seen in St Paul's Square during July 2014. It was one of five campaign medals issued to individuals who saw service in the First World War.

This time there was red, pink and purple coloured flowers around The British Victory Medal. It resembled an angel with wings. People out and about enjoying the summer sunshine, sitting on benches in their shorts and t-shirts, or just walking up towards St Paul's Church.

After the years of the Big Hoot & Big Sleuth (see below) it didn't feel like there was still a Birmingham City Centre Floral Trail. Or at least not as big as in past years. There were smaller trails, such as ones with dinosaurs when Dippy was on Tour. In August 2019 I saw the Angel in St Paul's Square again. Formerly known as The British Victory Medal in 2014. It was nice to see it again. The lavender that had been there for at least 10 years was still around.

The Big Hoot Birmingham 2015

Bejewelled Owl was by the artist Claire Scully and the sponsor was the Jewellery Quarter BID. It was near the lavender which comes up every summer. Seen during July 2015.

Slightly further back. People sitting on benches or walking past in St Paul's Square. Doesn't Bejewelled Owl look wonderful in the middle of the lavender? I once went to Provence in May 2011 but didn't see lavender there until we went to Norfolk in about July 2011.

The Big Sleuth Birmingham 2017

Peabody by the artist Tory Allen and the sponsor was the Jewellery Quarter BID. Seen during July 2017. The lavender was there again as it is every summer.

This view of Peabody with St Paul's Church and the distinctive spire.

From the back, Peabody seems to resemble the wings of butterflys. This view looking to Ludgate Hill.

There was at the time a second bear in St Paul's Square. Harley, the Original Bear's Angel, designed by Valerie Osement, painted by Mik Richardson and the sponsor was Harley Investments. The view to the main entrance of St Paul's Church.

From the back it looks like Harley was wearing (almost typed bearing) a leather jacket, which read "Bear's Angels Motorcycle Club West Midlands".

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Now at 1,100 followers. Thank you.

Birmingham We Are People with Passion award winner 2020

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