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Green open spaces
19 Aug 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Chinn Brook Meadows in the Shire Country Park

In Yardley Wood there is two areas named after the Chinn Brook. The Chinn Brook Meadows (also called the Chinn Brook Recreation Ground) and the Chinn Brook Nature Reserve. I've been to both a couple of times (usually walking from one part into the next). In this post though we will take a look at the Chinn Brook Meadows. From Trittiford Road / Highfield Road to Yardley Wood Road.

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Chinn Brook Meadows in the Shire Country Park





In Yardley Wood there is two areas named after the Chinn Brook. The Chinn Brook Meadows (also called the Chinn Brook Recreation Ground) and the Chinn Brook Nature Reserve. I've been to both a couple of times (usually walking from one part into the next). In this post though we will take a look at the Chinn Brook Meadows. From Trittiford Road / Highfield Road to Yardley Wood Road.


Chinn Brook Meadows

The Chinn Brook Meadows is one of the satellite parks of the Shire Country Park. Many locals in Yardley Wood still refer it to as the Chinn Brook Recreation Ground (and is labelled as that on Google Maps). The Chinn Brook Meadows is a 34 Acre site that stretches from Yardley Wood Road to the west, towards Trittiford Road and Highfield Road to the East. To the north is Chinn Brook Road and Glastonbury Road is to the south. The Chinn Brook flows through the Recreation Ground, where it joins up with the River Cole in The Dingles. Also nearby is the Trittiford Mill Pool to the east. The site was renamed in 2010 from the Chinn Brook Recreation Ground to the Chinn Brook Meadows, as it was thought that Meadows better reflects it's character.

 

I've had at least two full walks through the Chinn Brook Meadows. In December 2014 on Christmas Day and in April 2020 on a lockdown walk.

2014

For a Christmas Day morning walk on the 25th December 2014, we started our walk in the Chinn Brook Meadows. Getting in from the main entrance on Trittiford Road. There was this information sign and map, although vandals had tagged it at the time.

A look at the Chinn Brook from the bridge on Trittiford Road in Yardley Wood.

The fingerpost in the Chinn Brook Meadows was looking relatively new at the time. Directions to The Dingles, Trittiford Mill Pool and the Chinn Brook Nature Reserve.

The playground / play area that is close to Trittiford Road. There is also an entrance to it from Chinn Brook Road.

S bend in the Chinn Brook.

One of the footbridges over the Chinn Brook.

Was a nice sunny morning at the time, as I had a look over the footbridge. Bollards at both ends.

The path in the Chinn Brook Meadows goes past the field, that most people still call The Rec.

But it's what was growing alongside the path and the Chinn Brook that got it renamed to Chinn Brook Meadows.

More of the same near the Chinn Brook.

Trees not far from the houses on Chinn Brook Road.

The path curving to the right.

Near the end of The Rec section before you walk down a path to Yardley Wood Road.

A couple take their dog for a walk.

The gate at the end of the path near Yardley Wood Road. Exit here and cross over the road to enter the Chinn Brook Nature Reserve.

2017

In January 2017, I saw this carved wooden sculpture close to Highfield Road in Yardley Wood. It was probably done by local Birmingham based carver, Graham Jones. You can find his work in other parks and green spaces around Birmingham.

It had various carvings around it, such as birds and flowers.

Some details at the bottom including a swan.

Later that year in December 2017, while it was snowing in Yardley Wood, I walked down to the Trittiford Mill Pool. While there I got these snowy views towards the Chinn Brook Meadows.

The roads around it had been gritted by the council, but looks quite slushy and dirty.

This side was closer to The Dingles, but was the view in the direction of the Chinn Brook Meadows. Not seen snow around there since then.

2020

In April 2020 we had a lockdown walk through the Chinn Brook Meadows before heading into the Chinn Brook Nature Reserve. Parking on Chinn Brook Road, we passed the playground / play area which of course (at the time) was closed due to the pandemic / lockdown. So no child on the swings or slides until the beginning of July.

Looking through the swings to the slide from Chinn Brook Road.

Notices from the Council, to not enter the play area. Then again, some people ignored these, and hoped over the gate.

The Chinn Brook Meadows fingerpost from Chinn Brook Road, near the entrance to the play area.

One last look at the equipment that children couldn't use from about late March until early July 2020.

Surprisingly, there was a lot of families out in the Recreation Ground for a walk and exercise (more than my previous visit). At the time, getting out for your one form of daily exercise was allowed (apart from getting essentials from the shops).

Was a nice blue sky as we walked up the path towards Yardley Wood Road. Grass nice and short.

As before, the path curves around to the right. People taking their dogs for a walk and having fun in the Chinn Brook to the left.

Plenty of space here to have a game of football, although at the time that kind of activity was not allowed under the restrictions.

Nearing the end of the path close to The Rec.

The path to Yardley Wood Road was a bit narrower, and the leaves on the trees hadn't fully grown back.

Bluebells growing close to the path. When you couldn't go far at the time, your local green spaces was the only place to see them.

Such a short period of time to see the bluebells in flower.

This sign close to the Yardley Wood Road exit reminds you that this area is part of the Millstream Way. Also that it is illegal to access and ride with off-road motorcycles within the City Council parkland. But idiot youths keep ignoring this. And they spray painted over the West Midlands Police logo!

Later on the walk back from the Chinn Brook Nature Reserve down Chinn Brook Road. This was another one of the entrances. Such bright sunshine from that side.

Yellow flowers growing near the gate on Chinn Brook Road. According to Google Lens, they are called Gorse.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

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60 passion points
Green open spaces
17 Aug 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Fox Hollies Park from March to June 2020

Fox Hollies Park for me is the closest park in walking distance. Not that I always wanted to go there (due to shady characters). Popped in or nearby several times during the lockdown from March to June 2020. Usually on walks to or from Acocks Green. Recently local volunteers have gone around the park litter picking.

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Fox Hollies Park from March to June 2020





Fox Hollies Park for me is the closest park in walking distance. Not that I always wanted to go there (due to shady characters). Popped in or nearby several times during the lockdown from March to June 2020. Usually on walks to or from Acocks Green. Recently local volunteers have gone around the park litter picking.


Fox Hollies Park

This is my second Fox Hollies Park post. Find my original post here: Fox Hollies Park through the years.

March 2020

At the beginning of the lockdown, I had a late March 2020 walk around Fox Hollies Park. There wasn't many people in the park. As usual entered at Shirley Road and walk around the path along the Westley Brook. Saw a Jet2 plane taking off. Was starting to get rare to see passenger planes in the sky.

A look at the Westley Brook and the tree branches.

Taking a slightly different route through the trees along this dirt path.

More parts of the Westley Brook.

Trees leaning over the Westley Brook.

Trees without leaves on the path to the pond.

The Round Pool.

Danger No Swimming or Paddling. Duck on the left.

Metal footbridge on the right hand side of the Round Pool.

Pair of Canada geese.

Another duck.

April 2020

An afternoon walk around Acocks Green, and we briefly popped into Fox Hollies Park from Pool Farm Road near Fanshawe Road. It was a sunny afternoon and more people about.

Walked towards the Gospel Lane exit. Blue sky and leaves growing back on the trees. At the time you were not allowed in the play area, yet some men were inside playing with a remote controlled car!

Saw this structure from Gospel Lane. Probably somewhere for teenagers to hang about. After this continued my walk around Acocks Green and back into Hall Green.

June 2020

Early June 2020, and I went down Shirley Road to take something to the Post Office. Took this photo on my smartphone camera of the grass cut in stripes for social distancing.

Late June 2020, and walking back up Shirley Road after an evening walk down to Acocks Green Village.

The main entrance to Fox Hollies Park from Shirley Road through this new gateway.

The grass still cut at different levels for social distancing.

Long grass in a look towards the Shirley Road Play Area (which was still closed at the time).

For another nearby park in the area, check out my post on Langley Hall Park. It's just down Gospel Lane from Fox Hollies Park. And can be entered via Swanswell Road. It's just over the Birmingham / Solihull border in Olton / Kineton Green.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

 

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60 passion points
Green open spaces
11 Aug 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

The rest of Dartmouth Park in West Bromwich

Last time was the fun fairs, this time everything else at Dartmouth Park in West Bromwich. There is a bandstand and a pavilion. Also a War Memorial. Gatehouses at two of the entrance gates. A footbridge that goes over a major road. Plus a Pleasure Pool (or boating lake). The visits from July 2017 and August 2019. Not expecting to go back any time soon though.

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The rest of Dartmouth Park in West Bromwich





Last time was the fun fairs, this time everything else at Dartmouth Park in West Bromwich. There is a bandstand and a pavilion. Also a War Memorial. Gatehouses at two of the entrance gates. A footbridge that goes over a major road. Plus a Pleasure Pool (or boating lake). The visits from July 2017 and August 2019. Not expecting to go back any time soon though.


Dartmouth Park, West Bromwich

Previous post: Fun fairs post at Dartmouth Park.

Welcome to Dartmouth Park in West Bromwich. The park is close to West Bromwich Town Centre and Sandwell Valley Country Park. Surrounded by the following roads: The Expressway, Reform Street, Lloyd Street, Devonshire Drive and Trinity Way. It is a Grade II listed park, with a bandstand, War Memorial, Gatehouses, and a Pleasure Pool (boating lake). You can also hire bikes from the park at Valley Cycles.

My visits were in July 2017 (heading to Sandwell Valley on the Big Sleuth bear hunt) and August 2019 (in the area again and noticed that there was a footbridge to cross).

2017

The visit at the end of July 2017. Approaching the entrance gates from Reform Street in West Bromwich. Was an Asian wedding party there at the time, hence the car on the drive.

Later heading back into West Bromwich Town Centre, and back to the gates at Reform Street.

The gatehouse at the Reform Street entrance.

Later on the way out of the park I took another photo of the Reform Street gatehouse.

Outside of the Reform Street entrance was the Crown & Cushion pub nearby.

The War Memorial was on the left of the main entrance path. It is Grade II listed.

It dates to circa 1920. In memory of the local men and women lost during the Great War of 1914-18 (WW1).

At the top is a bronze winged statue.

Close up details of the bronze winged statue.

This green box was an electric feeder. Pre-war it was used to service the trams in West Bromwich. Post-war it was re-sighted here to light up the war memorial, and from 1951 worked the floral clock.

View of the Bandstand and Pavilion.

This time the Pavilion is to the left and the Bandstand to the right.

There was also this drinking fountain in the park.

A look (below) at the Jubilee Sensory Garden 2012.

Outdoor wooden instruments that you can interact with.

Heading down to the Pleasure Pool as I made my way towards Sandwell Valley.

To the far left was swan paddling boats you could hire for a ride.

There was about four swan boats here, with room for about 4 people in each. Also an inflatable boat to the left. Would assume you have to wear a life jacket.

There was also a pond with Canada geese and swans.

Be like the Chuckle Brothers and you could hire Surrey Bikes. Small £9 or Large £14. "To me ... to you!". Paul Chuckle is still alive, but his brother Barry passed away in August 2018.

You could also hire regular bikes from Valley Cycles. Adult Bikes from £7.50 or Kids Bikes from £6. Even a tricycle with a passenger seat at the back!

2019

After checking out the fun fair again, during the August 2019 visit, I made my way to the footbridge that I saw on Google Maps. Lots of trees on the walk along the path here.

Heading on along the path towards those trees.

More trees as I got close to the footbridge.

View of the park beyond from the curved ramp of the footbridge, as I was about to cross over The Expressway. Beyond the trees is the M5, and on the other side of the motorway is the Priory Woods. Where you can find the Sandwell Priory Ruins (somewhere to visit in the future).

First view of the curved ramp that leads to the footbridge I wanted to cross.

It appears to all be made out of concrete.

The start of the curved ramp from the park side.

Starting to walk up it.

Now on the actual bridge that crosses The Expressway.

About halfway over. Would be one more spiral ramp to go down.

Onto the next spiral ramp.

Going around in circles again. It takes you to the Beeches Road gate. Also directly opposite Herbert Street.

Almost near the bottom of the spiral ramp.

One last look at it.

There was another gatehouse, similar of design at the Beeches Road entrance.

View of the Beeches Road gates. Herbert Road is straight ahead.

Beeches Road gatehouse on the right and the gates in front.

The Beeches Road gatehouse also has a clock between the ground floor and first floor windows.

Before I left Dartmouth Park, saw this notice board and map from Sandwell MBC. It is also an alcohol restricted area from the West Midlands Police.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

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60 passion points
Classic Architecture
05 Aug 2020 - Elliott Brown
Did you know?

J.R.R. Tolkien's The Two Towers: Perrott's Folly and the Edgbaston Waterworks Tower

Welcome to another Ladywood related post. This time looking at The Two Towers that inspired J.R.R. Tolkien in The Lord of the Rings Trilogy. Perrott's Folly and the Edgbaston Waterworks Tower. Both are located on Waterworks Road in Ladywood, Birmingham. And are close to Edgbaston Reservoir. In the area that used to be called Rotton Park. Edgbaston Waterworks is managed by Severn Trent.

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J.R.R. Tolkien's The Two Towers: Perrott's Folly and the Edgbaston Waterworks Tower





Welcome to another Ladywood related post. This time looking at The Two Towers that inspired J.R.R. Tolkien in The Lord of the Rings Trilogy. Perrott's Folly and the Edgbaston Waterworks Tower. Both are located on Waterworks Road in Ladywood, Birmingham. And are close to Edgbaston Reservoir. In the area that used to be called Rotton Park. Edgbaston Waterworks is managed by Severn Trent.


Previous Tolkien posts here:

The Two Towers

Lets take a walk down Waterworks Road in Ladywood. If you leave Hagley Road, head up Plough & Harrow Road. Cross over Monument Road and you will get to Waterworks Road. One way to get back to Ladywood Middleway from Waterworks Road is via Harold Road and Noel Road, where there is some more views of the towers.

The first tower on your right will be Perrott's Folly. If you walk further down the road, you will get to the Edgbaston Waterworks Tower (which is within a Severn Trent faciliity so you can only see it from the road). If you are on Reservoir Road nearby, you might be able to spot the towers down the side roads, and it is even possible to see at least one of the towers from Edgbaston Reservoir. Further out in the City, there is views of The Two Towers from the top of Brindleyplace Car Park. Both of these towers (it has been suggested) may have inspired J.R.R. Tolkien for his book The Two Towers (the middle installment of the famous The Lord of the Rings Trilogy, later adapted into a movie trilogy by Peter Jackson, of which The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers was released in 2002).

 

Side by side comparison of The Two Towers from my original photos taken during June 2011. For the gallery of these, have a look further down the post.

In July 2013, the models of The Two Towers was in Centenary Square, around 2 months before the Library of Birmingham was opened. With a backdrop of the Hyatt Hotel and Symphony Hall.

Model of The Two Towers seen at Sarehole Mill during August 2015. They were moved here and is now their more permenant home (due to the Tolkien links).

View (below) of The Two Towers as seen from the car park behind the Birmingham Oratory during September 2019. Clearly Perrott's Folly (to the right) is taller than the Edgbaston Waterworks Tower (to the left).

In a June 2020 walk around Edgbaston Reservoir (below) I was able to get The Two Towers in one picture. But here, Perrott's Folly (on the left) looked shorter than the Edgbaston Waterworks Tower (on the right). Must be the different perspective.

Went back to Waterworks Road on the last day of July 2020 during a heatwave. Got this view of The Two Towers. Then also one from Noel Road around the corner off Harold Road.

 

Perrott's Folly

Located on Waterworks Road in Ladywood not far from Monument Road. Perrott's Folly was also known as The Monument or The Observatory. It was built in what was then Rotton Park by John Perrott in 1758. The land at the time was open countryside. He built it either to view his wife's grave from afar or to entertain guests or survery his land. He actually lived in Belbroughton. The tower was used from 1884 until 1979 as a weather recording station for the Birmingham & Midland Institute. The Perrott's Folly Company was formed in 1984 to restore the tower and open it to the public. But the company eventually closed in 2009. There was periods in the late 2000s when they opened it to the public. It is a Grade II* listed building. Built of red brick. Octagonal on a square base with a round stair turret. It was listed in 1952, and the listing was last amended in 1982.

 

My earliest series of photos of Perrott's Folly was taken back in June 2011 from Waterworks Road, which you can see below.

In July 2013, you could see the model of Perrott's Folly in the garden outside of The Library of Birmingham in Centenary Square (around 2 months before it opened to the public). But the area was fenced off until the end of August 2013.

The model of Perrott's Folly (seen below) at Sarehole Mill during August 2015. Was moved to it's now permenant home.

View of Perrott's Folly (below) seen during April 2018 from the top of Brindleyplace Car Park.

The view taken during February 2020 (below) of Perrott's Folly as seen from Reservoir Road (leaving Edgbaston Reservoir). Could see it over the chimneys up Reservoir Retreat.

On the last day of July 2020 I travelled to Ladywood, and while there headed down Waterworks Road from Plough & Harrow Road for a blue sky update!

 

Edgbaston Waterworks Tower

The Edgbaston Waterworks is located at the bottom end of Waterworks Road in Ladywood. It was also called the Edgbaston Pumping Station.  The buildings were designed by John Henry Chamberlain and William Martin during 1870. The buildings are Grade II listed. The site is run by Severn Trent Water. While it is close to Edgbaston Reservoir, there is no current or historical connection to the water here. The listing includes, the Edgbaston Pumping Station, store room, generator room and the ornamented chimney stack. The water pumping station apparently dates to about 1862. The tower was built of red brick with blue brick details. You can see how the tower influenced Tolkien for The Two Towers. Especially in the details at the top. First listed in 1979, the listing was amended in 2015.

 

My earliest series of photos of the Edgbaston Waterworks Tower was taken during June 2011 from Waterworks Road, which you can see below.

In July 2013, there was a model of the Edgbaston Waterworks Tower in Centenary Square, in the garden in front of the Library of Birmingham (two months before it would open to the public).

By August 2015, the model of the Edgbaston Waterworks Tower was now at it's now permenant home of Sarehole Mill (due to it's link with Tolkien).

There was a view (below) from the top of the Brindleyplace Car Park on my visit during April 2018 of the Edgbaston Waterworks Tower.

During February 2020, after leaving Edgbaston Reservoir via Reservoir Road (seen below), I spotted the Edgbaston Waterworks Tower down Mostyn Road over the chimneys.

I saw the Edgbaston Waterworks Tower from my June 2020 walk around Edgbaston Reservoir (below). I was hoping to get an individual photo of Perrott's Folly, but only got the pair of them together earlier on (see the photo further up this post). You can see how it inspired Tolkien in it's design.

Also got some last day of July 2020 photo updates of the Edgbaston Waterworks Tower. I noticed that one of the window shutters on the left hand side was damaged, and is in need of a repair. Also visible from Noel Road in Ladywood.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

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70 passion points
Environment & green action
03 Aug 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

The Blackberry Way and the Burbury Brickworks Nature Reserve in the Shire Country Park

Two sections of the Shire Country Park here. During a May 2020 lockdown walk. After leaving the Greet Mill Meadow at the Stratford Road, we continued on into the Blackberry Way. Then crossed into the Burbury Brickworks Nature Reserve from Formans Road in Sparkhill. Both run alongside the River Cole towards the Cole Valley Business Park. A lot of history here. Also a litter issue.

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The Blackberry Way and the Burbury Brickworks Nature Reserve in the Shire Country Park





Two sections of the Shire Country Park here. During a May 2020 lockdown walk. After leaving the Greet Mill Meadow at the Stratford Road, we continued on into the Blackberry Way. Then crossed into the Burbury Brickworks Nature Reserve from Formans Road in Sparkhill. Both run alongside the River Cole towards the Cole Valley Business Park. A lot of history here. Also a litter issue.


Blackberry Way and the

Burbury Brickworks Nature Reserve

The Blackberry Way and the Burbury Brickworks Nature Reserve are part of the Shire Country Park and are located in Sparkhill. My first walk in these areas was during a lockdown walk in May 2020, which started from the Sarehole Mill Car Park, and went via the Sarehole Mill Recreation Ground and the Greet Mill Meadow.

For related posts click the links below:

 

Blackberry Way

The Blackberry Way is located between the Stratford Road and Formans Road in Sparkhill (near the Springfield and Hall Green border). It starts from the Stratford Road Bridge (which opened in 1914) and runs alongside the River Cole. In the 14th century the area was known as Foulemoreslone or as Fole- or Fullford (foul ford). But today is called the Blackberry Way. It was named after a consultation with local residents and thought to be highly suitable as it is one of the best blackberry picking sections of the Shire Country Park. This area has a litter problem, either in the River Cole or alongside the path.

Starting from the Stratford Road entrance, just head into the gate on the right.

The sign for the Blackberry Way in the Shire Country Park from Birmingham City Council. It says "Please help us to care for your local green spaces. No Dumping of Rubbish".

Sadly the first thing I saw was rubbish down in the River Cole, and along the path.

Saw a dumped trolley hanging up-side-down on the poles of the sign near the Stratford Road. This is not the place to dump your rubbish, and the trolley should be at the supermarket it came from!

During May 2020, there was cow parsley growing alongside the path.

The trees were lush and green, having grown back fast during the second full month of lockdown.

The path continues straight on past the trees and cow parsley.

Approaching the gate at Formans Road. Beyond here was the Burbury Brickworks Nature Reserve.

Later coming back into the Blackberry Way. Headed down this grass path along the cow parsley.

A bit of a tree canopy here.

Getting back to the Stratford Road entrance, and soon about to go back into the Greet Mill Meadow.

Burbury Brickworks Nature Reserve

The Burbury Brickworks is located between Formans Road in Sparkhill and the Cole Valley Business Park. Beyond this area you can walk around The Ackers (which is beyond Warwick Road, but I've not done The Ackers yet). It is a 13 acre site of a former brick making factory that existed here until the early 1960s. The River Cole runs alongside one part of the nature reserve. When the brickworks closed the area returned to it's natural state. It now has a marshland and young oak trees. This area also had a litter problem.

The Burbury Brickworks Nature Reserve sign at the Formans Road entrance. As with the Blackberry Way this Birmingham City Council sign says "Please help us to care for your local green spaces. No Dumping of Rubbish".

There was a pair of paths in the Burbury Brickworks. We too the right path.

The trees on this path were lush and green. Some cow parsley along the path as well.

First signs of rubbish alongside the path. Why can't people dispose of their rubbish properly and use the bin?

So much takeaway rubbish around the benches that it attracted hungry crows looking for some food. The bin was also slanted a bit.

Nearing the gate close to the Cole Valley Business Park. Turned back after this. But did briefly pop out of the gate, and back in.

Beyond here is the Cole Valley Business Park. I would think you would have to walk or cycle past towards the Warwick Road to find the entrance to The Ackers, but I've not been there yet.

On the walk back in the Burbury Brickworks found part of the River Cole.

A wooden footbridge over a stream (I don't think this crosses the River Cole).

On the Wetland Walkway saw this pond surrounded by trees. It's hard to believe that a brickworks was in this area until about 60 years ago.

One of the fingerposts of the Shire Country Park was in the water. I'm not sure if it's still in there 2 and a half months on, but Council officials or park rangers needs to fish it out, and repair it.

On the way out saw this NO DUMPING sign from Birmingham City Council. Your City Your Birmingham. Can locals and visitors please not dump their waste in the Shire Country Park. Dispose of your litter properly. Care for the environment.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

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