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Green open spaces
17 Apr 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

The outer fringes of Sutton Park during 2017

I went to Sutton Coldfield a couple of times back in 2017. The first time in January 2017 to look around the Town Centre, then by August 2017 on The Big Sleuth bear hunt. So in January only skimmed the park from the road, and in August only popped in to find the bear they had there. On the way saw a couple of lakes. I've not yet been deep into Sutton Park, maybe one day in the future?

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The outer fringes of Sutton Park during 2017





I went to Sutton Coldfield a couple of times back in 2017. The first time in January 2017 to look around the Town Centre, then by August 2017 on The Big Sleuth bear hunt. So in January only skimmed the park from the road, and in August only popped in to find the bear they had there. On the way saw a couple of lakes. I've not yet been deep into Sutton Park, maybe one day in the future?


In 2017 I go the train to Sutton Coldfield on two different occasions. In January 2017 mainly to have a photo walk around Sutton Coldfield Town Centre. I returned in August 2017 for The Big Sleuth. I didn't go in 2015 for The Big Hoot as didn't want to do Sutton Coldfield for scratch with the owl sculptures as well. Although by 2017 there were some left to see in the Royal Town.

There was at least one bear in the summer of 2017 to see in Sutton Park. Once I got that, I walked towards Boldmere for the others (heading back into the town by Wylde Green and Maney finishing the trail at the Empire Cinema).

I also saw Sutton Park from the plane I was on, coming into land at Birmingham Airport around June 2017.

 

Some history of Sutton Park, taken from the Wikipedia page (link above). It is one of the largest urban parks in the UK. It is the largest country park in Birmingham (the Lickey Hills is second largest and Woodgate Valley is third largest) at 971.25 hectares (2,400 acres). Most of the park is a National Nature Reserve and parts of it is a Scheduled Ancient Monument. The Sutton Park railway line goes through the park. There is several pools of water located within Sutton Park, used for boating in some of them.

 

January 2017

I didn't go into Sutton Park on the 22nd January 2017. I walked past it on Clifton Road. From here is the entrance to the Clifton Road Youth Centre and the Clifton Road Outdoor Education Centre.

A close up look at the sign on Clifton Road. Wyndley Leisure Centre is also in the park. The customer car park was about 400 metres from here.

This sign mentions that Authorised parking for Clifton Road Youth Centre only.

Passing a bus stop on Clifton Road, there was leaves on the ground below the trees.

A pair of signs on Clifton Road. To the left is the Sutton Park Town Gate. While Sutton Town Centre was to the right of here. I was heading towards Sutton Coldfield Town Hall at the time, so did not go into the park. The Town Gate can be accessed from Park Road. The Town Hall was a short walk away up Upper Clifton Road (and the Town Hall was the priority at the time to find).

June 2017

Flying back from a holiday in Lyon, France, back to Birmingham Airport, I could see Sutton Park from the plane window as we came into land. This is probably the best way to see the park from above.

This was the first view from the plane of Sutton Park. You can see a couple of the pools from up here and the Sutton Park railway line that goes through the park. Blackroot Pool on the left and the Bracebridge Pool seen to the right.

The view of Sutton Park at the bottom, with Sutton Coldfield to the top. It's possible that the parkland in this photo below is of the New Hall Valley Country Park near Walmley, towards Minworth. The plane would have been circling.

A decent view of Sutton Park from the Flybe plane we were in as we were coming into land. You can just about see the jet near the wing on the left side of the plane. You can see how big it is from up here. The plane would have been circling on the way down to the runway.

August 2017

Starting at Clifton Road, I headed towards Wyndley Lane past the Wyndley Swimming Baths.

Behind the fences was the Royal Sutton Coldfield Athletics Club.

I'm not sure what was happening at the Royal Sutton Coldfield Athletics Club site at the time, but it was obviously unsafe, or having construction work done.

First view of the Wyndley Pool. There was some geese and swans in the water.

Panoramic of the Wyndley Pool. It's the oldest pool in the park, possibly dating back to the 12th century.

About three swans in the Wyndley Pool near some ducks.

Heading on, now on Monmouth Drive on the long walk to the Boldmere Gate.

Some long grass between the trees from Monmouth Drive,

Re-entering the park at the Boldmere Gate. It is on Stonehouse Road.

View of the Sutton Coldfield Sea Cadets from Stonehouse Road, which is near the Boldmere Gate. A cadet training ship (on dry land).

The Miller & Carter Sutton Park restaurant / steakhouse is near Powell's Pool from this car park. Also called The Lakeside Restaurant. It is close to Powell's Pool.

The Boldmere Lodge. Also known as the Boldmere Gate Cottage. Dating to 1901.

Boldmere Lodge was completed in 1901, just inside the Park gate. Powells Pool and the fields behind the lodge were still privately owned, and were not incorporated into the Park until 1937. Stonehouse Mill had been demolished and the area landscaped in 1936, giving the area its present appearance. The Park gate was later moved to a more convenient position a few yards further in to the Park.

Mural by Fauna Graphic. The building has barbed wire on the roof.

From Stonehouse Road (just up from the Boldmere Gate), you can see Powell's Pool. Which is near a Miller & Carter. The pool dates to the 18th century.

Stepped weir on Powell's Pool with Canada geese at the far end.

Yachts at the far side of Powell's Pool. Is the Sutton Sailing Club.

Views of some yachts on Powell's Pool. Xenon 5.

This one with a pink sail and a boy with a yellow helmet on.

After my long walk to get into Sutton Park via the Boldmere Gate, I eventually found The Big Sleuth bear called Mother Bear. By the artist Jenny Tang, the sponsor was Seesaws.

View of Mother Bear from the back. Images of polar bears.

Next to Mother Bear was this selfie frame that you could big up and share you photos with Seesaws Nursery.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Now at 1,100 followers. Thank you.

Birmingham We Are People with Passion award winner 2020

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Green open spaces
16 Apr 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Victoria Park in Smethwick

I popped into Victoria Park in Smethwick back in November 2018. There I found a war memorial and a sculpture on the outside wall. There was also another sculpture within the park in memory of the victims of the Birmingham Riots in 2011. It was unveiled in 2012. The park also has outdoor gym equipment and a bandstand. The park is close to the Smethwick Council House.

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Victoria Park in Smethwick





I popped into Victoria Park in Smethwick back in November 2018. There I found a war memorial and a sculpture on the outside wall. There was also another sculpture within the park in memory of the victims of the Birmingham Riots in 2011. It was unveiled in 2012. The park also has outdoor gym equipment and a bandstand. The park is close to the Smethwick Council House.


We start our look around one of the many parks around the Black Country that I've popped into over the years. In November 2018 I got a bus to Smethwick to check out the new Lions of the Great War statue, then I walked down the Smethwick High Street towards the Smethwick Council House before I found Victoria Park.

 

The Smethwick Heritage Centre Trust is to the right of the main entrance to the park. On the day of my visit it was closed. Normally it would be open on Thursday's, Friday's and Saturday's (during the lockdown period we are in I expect it is closed every day now). It is located in a former Park-Keepers Lodge.

The entrance to the museum would be round the back. They had collected over 20 years of artefacts, memorabilia and photographs connected to Smethwick's proud and distinct heritage. Their most popular material is their content relating to WW1 and WW2.

On the wall outside of the park near the Heritage Centre is this culpture called Birmid. There were some sections to the left and right that have gone missing. I don't know who the artist was.

Between the Smethwick Council House and the Heritage Centre is the War Memorial.

It is Grade II listed dating to 1920 made of granite and bronze.

The poppy wreaths were probably laid a few days before on Remembrance Sunday.

Many of these parks have these Lest We Forget soldier statues installed near the War Memorial.

There was also these poppies and crosses nearby as well.

Heading into the park saw this sign and notice board. Welcome to Victoria Park Smethwick.

Saw this bandstand in the distance.

This is the British Olympic heroes mural. It looks like an outdoor gym was behind.

Heading along a path further into the park saw this outdoor gym equipment. Bit like an outdoor treadmill.

This is the Birmingham Riots Memorial. Created by Infamous Arts.

The memorial was commissioned to commemorate the tragic deaths of Haroon Jahan, Shahzad Ali, and Abdul Musavir who were killed during the Birmingham Riots of 2011. The memorial was designed in conjunction with local primary schools who also assisted in the creation of tiles used within the mosaic work. It consists of three lamp posts, dedicated to each of the young men, along with a remembrance bench and dedication spiral on the floor. The memorial was unveiled in Smethwick’s Victoria Park on the 28th of September 2012.

Saw another sculpture, some kind of metal rock. Not sure what it is supposed to represent or who it was by.

Another outdoor gym equipment. Looks like a rowing machine.

Near the end of the path, close to Tiverton Road. I did not know that there was a pond in the park when I left (I can see it now on the Google Maps satellite view).

Another Welcome to Victoria Park Smethwick sign. Near the Tiverton Road exit / entrance.

Looking on the map, there is another entrance on Victoria Park Road. At the time I think I went back to a bus stop on the Smethwick High Street and caught a bus to Dudley.

 

The other park in Smethwick, is West Smethwick Park. I only went there once in June 2012 to see the James T. Chance sculpture and the memorial to John Homer Chance (so a post of that park will be quite small and I never went back). Looks like that has a Boating Lake. The main reason at the time for going to West Smethwick was to find the Malcolm X plaque on Marshall Street.

There is at least two other parks in Smethwick that I've never been to: Smethwick Hall Park and Harry Mitchell Park.

I've been to Langley Green once, but was not aware of the nearby parks: Barnford Hall Park and Langley Park.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Now at 1,110 followers. Thank you.

Birmingham We Are People with Passion award winner 2020

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14 Apr 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Elmdon Park in Solihull during late December 2015

This visit to Elmdon Park was a delayed Christmas Day 2015 walk on the 28th December 2015. It was a Bank Holiday Monday as Boxing Day 2015 was on a Saturday. The park is a local nature reserve in the Elmdon area of Solihull. Established in 1944 on the estate of Elmdon Hall. The park is close to the Jaguar Land Rover factory. Elmdon Church is located in the eastern part of the park.

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Elmdon Park in Solihull during late December 2015





This visit to Elmdon Park was a delayed Christmas Day 2015 walk on the 28th December 2015. It was a Bank Holiday Monday as Boxing Day 2015 was on a Saturday. The park is a local nature reserve in the Elmdon area of Solihull. Established in 1944 on the estate of Elmdon Hall. The park is close to the Jaguar Land Rover factory. Elmdon Church is located in the eastern part of the park.


Welcome to Elmdon Park in Solihull. It was the Christmas - New Year period, so late December 2015. Couldn't go for a park walk on Christmas Day 2015 as it was raining. Boxing Day fell on a Saturday, so the Bank Holiday Monday was on the 28th December 2015.

The park was established in 1944 by the then Solihull Urban District Council from the house and grounds of Elmdon Hall which was derelict at the time. The house was used by the Home Guard (Solihull's very own Dad's Army) before becoming derelict and it was demolished in 1956.

Elmdon Church is located within the park, also known as St Nicholas's Church. There is also a old walled garden which is now a local nature reserve managed by the Warwickshire Wildlife Trust. The park also has playgrounds, tennis courts, and football pitches.

To the South and West of the park is the massive Jaguar Land Rover plant. Birmingham Airport is to the east of the park. I'm not sure if there is an entrance to the park from the Coventry Road or Damson Parkway. The main entrance to the park is from Tanhouse Farm Road and Elmdon Park Road.

 

Near the car park from Elmdon Park Road was this Welcome to Elmdon Park sign and map.

The football pitch with at least one goalpost visible to the far left of this tree.

Views of the playground. Not entirely sure what this semi circle structure is, perhaps a modern bandstand? Swings are seen behind.

All the usual playground equipment that you would normally find in a park play area. (I would expect all of this to now be closed during lockdown).

Twitters the wooden owl sculpture. 'Twitters' came to Eldon Park in 2003 and is carved from a tree that was removed from the park.

A waterfall near Elmdon Lake. With ducks at the top.

Ducks at the top of the waterfall at the Elmdon Lake.

An old stone footbridge over the Elmdon Lake. Would assume this is something that has survived from the Elmdon Hall Estate.

One of the many views of the Elmdon Lake. Most of the ducks, gulls, geese and swans were close to the waterfall end.

At this point the Elmdon Lake gets thin and narrow towards the Hatchford Brook.

Baubles on a Christmas Tree.

Something that won't be possible now, but back then, a group of runners were seen going up the hill.

A view of the chimneys at Jaquar Land Rover.

View further back of Jaguar Land Rover with an interesting looking tree in the middle.

At the time someone left this beanie hat on a wooden post which had BOOM all over it!

A beacon in Elmdon Park. A beacon to commemorate the joining of the EU was installed in 1992, and this now marks the centre of Elmdon Hall. (of course the UK just left the EU when Brexit went through).

This is Elmdon Church. Also known as  The Parish Church of St Nicholas Elmdon. It is a Grade II listed building: Church of St Nicholas, Solihull. Designed by John Standbridge of Warwick in 1780-1. Altered in 1979. Made with Ashlar limestone and slate roofs. It is hidden in a dense woodland.

About 5 wooden bollards here. The path here was a bit muddy.

Suburban Solihull from the top of the hill. These houses are a bit further north of Jaguar Land Rover.

Heading back past the playground / play area. Saw this wooden frame thing, think kids are supposed to swing like monkeys on the ropes.

Heading back to the car park, saw this wooden Owl totem pole. The totem pole was created from ideas put forward by local schools, after an Oaks and Shires event in 2004. Below the owl it looks like a horse.

Just before we left, saw this Solihull M.B.C. Elmdon Park sign near the entrance. Solihull Council has similar signs to this in their other parks and green spaces all over the Metropolitan Borough.

For more Elmdon Park photos please check out my album on Flickr here: Elmdon Park.

 

I might not be able to get to parks further away now, but in the past I've done photos walks to parks in:

Sandwell

  1. Lightwoods Park, Bearwood,
  2. Victoria Park, Smethwick
  3. West Smethwick Park
  4. Victoria Park, Tipton
  5. Warley Woods
  6. Dartmouth Park, West Bromwich
  7. Sandwell Valley Country Park, West Bromwich

Dudley

  1. Priory Park, Dudley
  2. Leasowes Park, Halesowen
  3. Mary Stevens Park, Stourbridge

Wolverhampton

  1. West Park, Wolverhampton

So will hope to do posts for those parks in the future (I already did one for Sandwell Valley Country Park).

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Now at 1,100 followers. Thank you.

Birmingham We Are People with Passion award winner 2020

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07 Apr 2020 - Elliott Brown
Inspiration

Kings Heath Park over the years from 2012 to 2019

I might not be able to go to Kings Heath Park now (as it's not in walking distance), but we can look back at my photos taken between 2012 and 2019 when I was able to get an 11C to Kings Heath. Most of my early photos were taken around February 2012, and I have returned on and off ever since. Although probably went to this park as a child in the 1980s (using the playground).

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Kings Heath Park over the years from 2012 to 2019





I might not be able to go to Kings Heath Park now (as it's not in walking distance), but we can look back at my photos taken between 2012 and 2019 when I was able to get an 11C to Kings Heath. Most of my early photos were taken around February 2012, and I have returned on and off ever since. Although probably went to this park as a child in the 1980s (using the playground).


It's about time for a new Kings Heath Park post, but using my photos taken on walks around the park between 2012 and 2019. Usually travel to Kings Heath on the 11C bus, but the 76 also goes past the park. The bus stop is on the Vicarage Road, but I might sometimes now get off on Addison Road and stop off for a coffee before walking to the park (of course this was all before lockdown). The schools of King Edward VI Camp Hill are located next door to the park. The High Street and Alcester Road South are in walking distance of the park down Vicarage Road.

 

For my previous Kings Heath Park posts click the following links to read and enjoy the photos:

 

2012

I first had a photo walk around Kings Heath Park in early February 2012.

Near the corner of the Vicarage Road and Avenue Road entrance is The Lodge at 72 Vicarage Road.

Swings in the playground as a jogger runs past me. I probably used these facilities back in the 1980s (These are not the same swings and slides as when I was a child and there wasn't a perimeter fence 35 years ago, but was in the same location).

This slide has a cylindrical shaped for kids to climb up.

It was winter and it was very cold as I walked around the paths in the park. The grass was frosted. And it snowed later that day.

Some dirt paths amongst the trees. They lead to the ponds.

The pond was completely frozen over at the time.

View to the School of Horticultural Training in what was Kings Heath House. A Grade II listed building School of Horticultural Training (in Kings Heath Park), Birmingham.  Dates to the early 19th century. But a previous house on this site that was owned by John Harwood was burnt down in 1791 during the Birmingham 'Church and King' Riots of 1791 (according to Bill Dargue's site (Kings Heath - Bill Dargue). The City Council later bought the existing house and grounds in 1908. It became a training centre for Birmingham Parks staff and the Birmingham Horticultural Training School was housed here from 1952.

This view of the pond while frozen opposite the School of Horticultural Training.

A dirt path through some trees. At the furthest end of the park, not far from the Camp Hill Line.

Several branches lying on the ground near the bed of leaves.

Another playground close to the Avenue Road entrance with this tyre that kids can slide down the rope.

Also saw this squirrel at the time.

2013

Trees in Kings Heath Park seen during the middle of May 2013. This was the day of the Free Radio Walkathon (link to the post is above). The trees were seen on Vicarage Road.

A couple of weeks later and saw these bluebells from Avenue Road on the Late May Bank Holiday Weekend. From a walk down to Dog Pool Lane and Dad's Lane in Selly Park.

2014

The visit during a warm March 2014, was to see the TV Garden on an Open Sunday, I only had my then smartphone camera with me at the time.

Saw this flower tower. The flower pots were planted by Cofton Nursery (Birmingham Bloom).

There ws also this flower bed. I think it was close to Kings Heath House.

The pond in fine weather. I was trying to record a video clip but somehow also got this photo of the pond as well.

This time the sky was blue and the water jet fountains in the pond was one. Is several areas to sit with benches around the ponds.

TV Garden

The TV Garden was open on Sunday 16th March 2014, and it is usually open about once a month in the afternoon. Although this was the only time I went around it. It was formerly used by ATV and Central TV in the past.

View of some greenhouses.

Close up to the three greenhouses in the wonderful sunshine.

Small pond with an abstract sculpture in it.

Decking over a sandy beach leading to a beach hut.

This area was taped off as there was a sprinkler watering the plants.

Triangular sculptures and  a small palm tree.

A wet patch, or another pond.

Beyond the pond, on the right was a green shipping container. Daffodils in the background.

2015

During the summer of 2015, The Big Hoot 2015 owl sculpture trail was on around Birmingham, and that included Kings Heath. Was two owls in the park, one big one, and a Little Hoot owl in the tea room. I saw them during August 2015.

Outside was Blodeuwedd by the artist Guy McKinley. The sponsor was Wild in Art (who runs these trails all over the country / world).

As close up look at Blodeuwedd.

The back of Blodeuwedd. I only really got this one from the side.

Inside of the tea room at Kings Heath House was the Big Hoot's Little Hoot owl was Annie's Owl by Vinnie the Coach. Vinnie illustrates how The Little Hoot can be used as a device to enable young people of all ages to achieve their Arts Award. He takes inspiration from acclaimed Birmingham writer Benjamin Zephaniah's poem Nature Trail and visual influence from Vincent van Gogh. The sculpture is in memory of local resident Matt Kendall and will be a permanent monument for the Foundation set up in his honour.

The Big Hoot website that was up in 2015 is no longer online sadly. But has been saved / archived on the Wayback Machine. The Big Sleuth in 2017 did not have a trail around Kings Heath, which was a bit disappointing.

2016

Just one photo of Kings Heath Park taken on my then smartphone camera during May 2016. There was warm sunny weather at the time. Just up the path from the Vicarage Road. I think I sat on a bench to have a sandwich. The view towards the playground.

2017

This view of red tulips seen from the 11A bus on the Vicarage Road, passing Kings Heath Park during April 2017.

In August 2017 this gate at the corner of Vicarage Road and Avenue Road was temporarily closed as a precautionary measure. It was probably to stop travellers driving their caravans into the park and setting up an illegal camp.

Again sat on a park bench in Kings Heath Park, in a view similar to the one from a year before. This time as well as the playground, you could see the spire of All Saints Church.

My next proper walk in Kings Heath Park was during the autumn of October 2017. This was the start of a walk along the path near Avenue Road towards a bus stop on the Pershore Road in Selly Park.

A nice floral display around these bushes and trees.

Leaves all over the lawn near the playground, not far from Avenue Road.

Leaves falling off the trees. This relatively new looking tree had yellow leaves coming down.

Saw a squirrel near one of the trees on the grass near all the leaves.

2018

A quick visit in February 2018. There was scaffolding on the School of Horticultural Training - Kings Heath House.

This view of the scaffolding from the pond side.

Crocuses seen above the grass.

My next visit was during April 2018. It was a nice sunny day, and I popped into Kings Heath Park before walking down Avenue Road, Dad's Lane and Moor Green Lane, before going into the Holders Lane & Pebble Mills Fields (rear entrance of Cannon Hill Park).

Got some decent photos of the water jet fountains in the pond.

Zooming in past the water jet fountain to the ducks.

Red and yellow coloured flowers seen on the woodland walk.

This tree hadn't yet had it's leaves grow back at the time.

White daffodils with orange parts in the middle.

Yellow daffodils on the hill near Avenue Road. Just before passing the Camp Hill Line railway bridge.

Caught this squirrel before I headed down Dad's Lane.

Another walk around Kings Heath Park, this time during October 2018. This was from one of the times where I had a coffee at Coffee#1 then walked down to the park for a photo walk.

A dog being walked on a leash.

More autumnal trees with leaves on the ground on the side near Avenue Road.

There was a lot of leaves on the ground around these purple coloured flowers.

More leaves on the ground around one of the paths.

Saw these sheds / garages that I hadn't noticed on previous visits to the park.

Close to one of the car parks was this small rock garden with summery trees.

For my photos from November 2018 please check out my post here: Raining at Kings Heath Park in late November 2018.

2019

For my April 2019 photos please check out this post here: Kings Heath Park over the Easter Bank Holiday Weekend 2019

My last walk to date walking around Kings Heath Park was in October 2019. Again a walk after having a coffee at Coffee#1.

This time getting some new photos close up of the playground since my original photos back in 2012.

Saw some orange berries on a tree.

I thought that the play equipment was new, but it's probably the same ones that I've always seen in this playground.

As with other City parks, they have the yellow playground sign here. Welcome to Kings Heath Park Play Area. (of course now during the lockdown it is closed while the park is open).

This slide is the exact same one that I took in 2012, but from the other side. When I used the slides and swings here in the mid 1980s, the equipment was different and there wasn't a perimeter fence around the playground. The benches in the park back then were also different.

Another dog going for walk, this one didn't have a leash on (it's owner would have been nearby).

Another squirrel running across the grass with leaves everywhere.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Now at 1,100 followers. Thank you.

Birmingham We Are People with Passion award winner 2020

 

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70 passion points
Green open spaces
06 Apr 2020 - Elliott Brown
Inspiration

Edgbaston Reservoir in Ladywood over the years

The last time I had a walk round Edgbaston Reservoir (well half of it) was about a month before lockdown. But I have been many times to the reservoir in Ladywood over the years. Sometimes I walk the full lap, sometimes half. It was originally known as the Rotton Park Reservoir. Originally a small pool called the Rock Pool. Enlarged by Thomas Telford for the Birmingham Canal Navigations.

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Edgbaston Reservoir in Ladywood over the years





The last time I had a walk round Edgbaston Reservoir (well half of it) was about a month before lockdown. But I have been many times to the reservoir in Ladywood over the years. Sometimes I walk the full lap, sometimes half. It was originally known as the Rotton Park Reservoir. Originally a small pool called the Rock Pool. Enlarged by Thomas Telford for the Birmingham Canal Navigations.


Some history about the Edgbaston Reservoir from Wikipedia.

Located in Ladywood, Birmingham, the reservoir was originally called the Rotton Park Reservoir and on early maps as the Rock Pool Reservoir. Between 1824-29 Thomas Telford expanded the pool to supply water to the Birmingham Canal Navigations for the Birmingham and Wolverhampton Levels, as he was straightening out James Brindley's old canal. This became the Birmingham Canal Navigations New Mainline. The Icknield Port Loop is close to the dam at the reservoir.

These days the reservoir is used for leisure, there is a path all the way around for walking, cycling and for dog walkers. The reservoir is also used for rowing and sailing. The Midland Sailing Club is also based at Edgbaston Reservoir. From April 2019, the car parks were closed off to vehicles due to anti-social behaviour.

 

2011

My first visit to Edgbaston Reservoir was during May 2011. So the water looked nice and blue at the time. I went in the main entrance from Reservoir Road. And probably headed to the left around the reservoir in a clockwise direction.

The trees were lush and green as some pigeons flew by.

A tree here was just a stump, and it looked like the reservoir was receding at bit, like a beach.

Some nice shadows from the trees.

Hard to believe that this was all man made in the 19th century.

From here you can see the dam and the skyline, from here the BT Tower was visible.

Can just about make out the Edgbaston Waterworks Tower from here.

The main entrance to the resevoir from Reservoir Road, and to the left was The Tower Dancing & Banqueting Suite (now closed down but open at the time).

2014

My second visit was during February 2014. The conditions was windy and blustery with choppy water. Again approaching from the Reservoir Road main entrance. So perfect weather for sailing or canoeing.

Plenty of cars in the car park at the time (it would be open for another 5 years).

This time I could see sailors in yachts in the reservoir. Perfect conditions for sailing.

This one had a sail with the code: GBR 11224.

This sailor has 4186.

This pair had E GBR 22901.

Several yachts seen sailing here.

This one in a canoe with a sail.

This canoeist had 133256. The spire of St Augustine's Church was behind.

Three people in a speedboat marked MSC, Joan.

2018

My third visit was during July 2018 during the summer heatwave. There was a drought at the time and all the grass all over the City had gone yellow. The reservoir around the edges was looking quite dry. This time I got into the reservoir from the Rotton Park Road entrance at the back.

It was a bit like a beach, the grass was dry and the trees were green, but was very hot.

The reservoir had lost a lot of water during this dry spell. There should be water on the parts that look like dry soil beaches.

Birmingham skyline view behind the dam. Including the BT Tower and Three Snowhill was under construction at the time.

Just look at this poor heron near the edge of the reservoir. Was also a fish struggling for water when it should have been below it!

The western edge of the Reservoir with the skyline above the dam. It was looking quite green in the parts not covered with water.

This could be like a beach right here in Birmingham, but the ground was not find sand. And you shouldn't really sit on the edges. Picnics are probably done in the summer of the grassy parts.

I don't think I've seen the reservoir like this before or since. Once it started raining again, it probably filled back up and went back to normal. Another dam / skyline view.

Even this corner near the dam was dry and lacking reservoir water. After this I left the reservoir via the main Reservoir Road entrance and walked towards Broadway Plaza.

2020

This was during February 2020, a walk that started in Harborne. Got onto the Edgbaston Reservoir again at Rotton Park Road. Since my last visit they had laid new tarmac paths and the water level had gone back to normal.

View towards the Midland Sailing Club.

The nice new tarmaced path, this was during the period after the storms, so the path was a bit wet. Ahead was a person running.

Several cyclists doing laps around the reservoir. This was before social distancing measures.

Over the dam could just see some residential tower blocks.

I only walked halfway around the reservoir this time.

It was looking full of water and in better condition than the drought of 2 years before.

Saw this Great cormorant sitting on a branch of a tree that was in the water.

Gulls flying about over the reservoir like they do.

At the Midland Sailing Club was yacht 3530 and the speedboat MSC, with the name Joan.

One last look at the reservoir. At the time I didn't know why the car park was empty, then saw that the barrier at the Reservoir Road entrance was closed.

After this I continued my walk via the new Ladywood Leisure Centre into the City Centre (don't think I want to do a Harborne via Edgbaston Reservoir to City Centre walk again was too long). Might be a while before I can come back here, so enjoy my photos from my four visits over 2011, 2014, 2018 and 2020.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Now at 1,100 followers. Thank you.

Birmingham We Are People with Passion award winner 2020

 

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