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05 Aug 2020 - Elliott Brown
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J.R.R. Tolkien's The Two Towers: Perrott's Folly and the Edgbaston Waterworks Tower

Welcome to another Ladywood related post. This time looking at The Two Towers that inspired J.R.R. Tolkien in The Lord of the Rings Trilogy. Perrott's Folly and the Edgbaston Waterworks Tower. Both are located on Waterworks Road in Ladywood, Birmingham. And are close to Edgbaston Reservoir. In the area that used to be called Rotton Park. Edgbaston Waterworks is managed by Severn Trent.

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J.R.R. Tolkien's The Two Towers: Perrott's Folly and the Edgbaston Waterworks Tower





Welcome to another Ladywood related post. This time looking at The Two Towers that inspired J.R.R. Tolkien in The Lord of the Rings Trilogy. Perrott's Folly and the Edgbaston Waterworks Tower. Both are located on Waterworks Road in Ladywood, Birmingham. And are close to Edgbaston Reservoir. In the area that used to be called Rotton Park. Edgbaston Waterworks is managed by Severn Trent.


Previous Tolkien posts here:

The Two Towers

Lets take a walk down Waterworks Road in Ladywood. If you leave Hagley Road, head up Plough & Harrow Road. Cross over Monument Road and you will get to Waterworks Road. One way to get back to Ladywood Middleway from Waterworks Road is via Harold Road and Noel Road, where there is some more views of the towers.

The first tower on your right will be Perrott's Folly. If you walk further down the road, you will get to the Edgbaston Waterworks Tower (which is within a Severn Trent faciliity so you can only see it from the road). If you are on Reservoir Road nearby, you might be able to spot the towers down the side roads, and it is even possible to see at least one of the towers from Edgbaston Reservoir. Further out in the City, there is views of The Two Towers from the top of Brindleyplace Car Park. Both of these towers (it has been suggested) may have inspired J.R.R. Tolkien for his book The Two Towers (the middle installment of the famous The Lord of the Rings Trilogy, later adapted into a movie trilogy by Peter Jackson, of which The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers was released in 2002).

 

Side by side comparison of The Two Towers from my original photos taken during June 2011. For the gallery of these, have a look further down the post.

dndimg alt="Two Towers" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Perrotts Folly and Edgbaston Waterworks Tower.jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

In July 2013, the models of The Two Towers was in Centenary Square, around 2 months before the Library of Birmingham was opened. With a backdrop of the Hyatt Hotel and Symphony Hall.

dndimg alt="The Two Towers" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Two Towers Cent Sq (Jul 2013) (5).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

Model of The Two Towers seen at Sarehole Mill during August 2015. They were moved here and is now their more permenant home (due to the Tolkien links).

dndimg alt="The Two Towers" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Sarehole Mill Two Towers.jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

View (below) of The Two Towers as seen from the car park behind the Birmingham Oratory during September 2019. Clearly Perrott's Folly (to the right) is taller than the Edgbaston Waterworks Tower (to the left).

dndimg alt="The Two Towers" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Two Towers Oratory (Sept 2019).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

In a June 2020 walk around Edgbaston Reservoir (below) I was able to get The Two Towers in one picture. But here, Perrott's Folly (on the left) looked shorter than the Edgbaston Waterworks Tower (on the right). Must be the different perspective.

dndimg alt="The Two Towers" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Edgbaston Res Two Towers (June 2020) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Went back to Waterworks Road on the last day of July 2020 during a heatwave. Got this view of The Two Towers. Then also one from Noel Road around the corner off Harold Road.

dndimg alt="Two Towers" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Two Towers Tolkien (July 2020) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Two Towers" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Two Towers Tolkien (July 2020) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Perrott's Folly

Located on Waterworks Road in Ladywood not far from Monument Road. Perrott's Folly was also known as The Monument or The Observatory. It was built in what was then Rotton Park by John Perrott in 1758. The land at the time was open countryside. He built it either to view his wife's grave from afar or to entertain guests or survery his land. He actually lived in Belbroughton. The tower was used from 1884 until 1979 as a weather recording station for the Birmingham & Midland Institute. The Perrott's Folly Company was formed in 1984 to restore the tower and open it to the public. But the company eventually closed in 2009. There was periods in the late 2000s when they opened it to the public. It is a Grade II* listed building. Built of red brick. Octagonal on a square base with a round stair turret. It was listed in 1952, and the listing was last amended in 1982.

 

My earliest series of photos of Perrott's Folly was taken back in June 2011 from Waterworks Road, which you can see below.

dndimg alt="Perrott's Folly" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Perrotts Folly (June 2011) (1).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Perrott's Folly" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Perrotts Folly (June 2011) (2).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Perrott's Folly" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Perrotts Folly (June 2011) (3).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Perrott's Folly" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Perrotts Folly (June 2011) (4).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Perrott's Folly" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Perrotts Folly (June 2011) (5).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Perrott's Folly" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Perrotts Folly (June 2011) (6).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Perrott's Folly" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Perrotts Folly (June 2011) (7).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Perrott's Folly" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Perrotts Folly (June 2011) (9).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

In July 2013, you could see the model of Perrott's Folly in the garden outside of The Library of Birmingham in Centenary Square (around 2 months before it opened to the public). But the area was fenced off until the end of August 2013.

dndimg alt="Perrott's Folly" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Two Towers Cent Sq (Jul 2013) (4).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Perrott's Folly" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Two Towers Cent Sq (Jul 2013) (7).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

The model of Perrott's Folly (seen below) at Sarehole Mill during August 2015. Was moved to it's now permenant home.

dndimg alt="Perrott's Folly" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Two Towers Sarehole Mill (Aug 2015) (2).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

View of Perrott's Folly (below) seen during April 2018 from the top of Brindleyplace Car Park.

dndimg alt="Perrott's Folly" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/The Two Towers from Brindleyplace (April 2018) (2).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

The view taken during February 2020 (below) of Perrott's Folly as seen from Reservoir Road (leaving Edgbaston Reservoir). Could see it over the chimneys up Reservoir Retreat.

dndimg alt="Perrot's Folly" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/The Two Towers (Feb 2020) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

On the last day of July 2020 I travelled to Ladywood, and while there headed down Waterworks Road from Plough & Harrow Road for a blue sky update!

dndimg alt="Perrott's Folly" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Perrotts Folly (July 2020) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Perrott's Folly" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Perrotts Folly (July 2020) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Perrott's Folly" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Perrotts Folly (July 2020) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Perrott's Folly" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Perrotts Folly (July 2020) (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Perrott's Folly" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Perrotts Folly (July 2020) (5).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Edgbaston Waterworks Tower

The Edgbaston Waterworks is located at the bottom end of Waterworks Road in Ladywood. It was also called the Edgbaston Pumping Station.  The buildings were designed by John Henry Chamberlain and William Martin during 1870. The buildings are Grade II listed. The site is run by Severn Trent Water. While it is close to Edgbaston Reservoir, there is no current or historical connection to the water here. The listing includes, the Edgbaston Pumping Station, store room, generator room and the ornamented chimney stack. The water pumping station apparently dates to about 1862. The tower was built of red brick with blue brick details. You can see how the tower influenced Tolkien for The Two Towers. Especially in the details at the top. First listed in 1979, the listing was amended in 2015.

 

My earliest series of photos of the Edgbaston Waterworks Tower was taken during June 2011 from Waterworks Road, which you can see below.

dndimg alt="Edgbaston Waterworks Tower" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Edgbaston Waterworks Tower (June 2011) (1).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Edgbaston Waterworks Tower" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Edgbaston Waterworks Tower (June 2011) (2).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Edgbaston Waterworks Tower" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Edgbaston Waterworks Tower (June 2011) (4).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Edgbaston Waterworks Tower" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Edgbaston Waterworks Tower (June 2011) (5).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Edgbaston Waterworks Tower" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Edgbaston Waterworks Tower (June 2011) (6).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Edgbaston Waterworks Tower" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Edgbaston Waterworks Tower (June 2011) (7).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Edgbaston Waterworks Tower" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Edgbaston Waterworks Tower (June 2011) (8).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Edgbaston Waterworks Tower" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Edgbaston Waterworks Tower (June 2011) (9).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

In July 2013, there was a model of the Edgbaston Waterworks Tower in Centenary Square, in the garden in front of the Library of Birmingham (two months before it would open to the public).

dndimg alt="Edgbaston Waterworks Tower" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Two Towers Cent Sq (Jul 2013) (1).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Edgbaston Waterworks Tower" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Two Towers Cent Sq (Jul 2013) (2).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Edgbaston Waterworks Tower" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Two Towers Cent Sq (Jul 2013) (3).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Edgbaston Waterworks Tower" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Two Towers Cent Sq (Jul 2013) (6).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

By August 2015, the model of the Edgbaston Waterworks Tower was now at it's now permenant home of Sarehole Mill (due to it's link with Tolkien).

dndimg alt="Edgbaston Waterworks Tower" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Two Towers Sarehole Mill (Aug 2015) (1).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

There was a view (below) from the top of the Brindleyplace Car Park on my visit during April 2018 of the Edgbaston Waterworks Tower.

dndimg alt="Edgbaston Waterworks Tower" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/The Two Towers from Brindleyplace (April 2018) (1).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

During February 2020, after leaving Edgbaston Reservoir via Reservoir Road (seen below), I spotted the Edgbaston Waterworks Tower down Mostyn Road over the chimneys.

dndimg alt="Edgbaston Waterworks Tower" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/The Two Towers (Feb 2020) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

I saw the Edgbaston Waterworks Tower from my June 2020 walk around Edgbaston Reservoir (below). I was hoping to get an individual photo of Perrott's Folly, but only got the pair of them together earlier on (see the photo further up this post). You can see how it inspired Tolkien in it's design.

dndimg alt="Edgbaston Waterworks Tower" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Edgbaston Res Two Towers (June 2020) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Also got some last day of July 2020 photo updates of the Edgbaston Waterworks Tower. I noticed that one of the window shutters on the left hand side was damaged, and is in need of a repair. Also visible from Noel Road in Ladywood.

dndimg alt="Edgbaston Waterworks Tower" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Edgbaston Waterworks Tower (July 2020) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Edgbaston Waterworks Tower" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Edgbaston Waterworks Tower (July 2020) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Edgbaston Waterworks Tower" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Edgbaston Waterworks Tower (July 2020) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

dndimg alt="Edgbaston Waterworks Tower" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Edgbaston Waterworks Tower (July 2020) (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

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Elliott Brown Environment & green action
03 Aug 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

The Blackberry Way and the Burbury Brickworks Nature Reserve in the Shire Country Park

Two sections of the Shire Country Park here. During a May 2020 lockdown walk. After leaving the Greet Mill Meadow at the Stratford Road, we continued on into the Blackberry Way. Then crossed into the Burbury Brickworks Nature Reserve from Formans Road in Sparkhill. Both run alongside the River Cole towards the Cole Valley Business Park. A lot of history here. Also a litter issue.

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The Blackberry Way and the Burbury Brickworks Nature Reserve in the Shire Country Park





Two sections of the Shire Country Park here. During a May 2020 lockdown walk. After leaving the Greet Mill Meadow at the Stratford Road, we continued on into the Blackberry Way. Then crossed into the Burbury Brickworks Nature Reserve from Formans Road in Sparkhill. Both run alongside the River Cole towards the Cole Valley Business Park. A lot of history here. Also a litter issue.


Blackberry Way and the

Burbury Brickworks Nature Reserve

The Blackberry Way and the Burbury Brickworks Nature Reserve are part of the Shire Country Park and are located in Sparkhill. My first walk in these areas was during a lockdown walk in May 2020, which started from the Sarehole Mill Car Park, and went via the Sarehole Mill Recreation Ground and the Greet Mill Meadow.

For related posts click the links below:

 

Blackberry Way

The Blackberry Way is located between the Stratford Road and Formans Road in Sparkhill (near the Springfield and Hall Green border). It starts from the Stratford Road Bridge (which opened in 1914) and runs alongside the River Cole. In the 14th century the area was known as Foulemoreslone or as Fole- or Fullford (foul ford). But today is called the Blackberry Way. It was named after a consultation with local residents and thought to be highly suitable as it is one of the best blackberry picking sections of the Shire Country Park. This area has a litter problem, either in the River Cole or alongside the path.

Starting from the Stratford Road entrance, just head into the gate on the right.

dndimg alt="Blackberry Way" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Blackberry Way SCP (May 2020) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

The sign for the Blackberry Way in the Shire Country Park from Birmingham City Council. It says "Please help us to care for your local green spaces. No Dumping of Rubbish".

dndimg alt="Blackberry Way" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Blackberry Way SCP (May 2020) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Sadly the first thing I saw was rubbish down in the River Cole, and along the path.

dndimg alt="Blackberry Way" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Blackberry Way SCP (May 2020) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Saw a dumped trolley hanging up-side-down on the poles of the sign near the Stratford Road. This is not the place to dump your rubbish, and the trolley should be at the supermarket it came from!

dndimg alt="Blackberry Way" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Trolley Blackberry Way SCP (May 2020).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

During May 2020, there was cow parsley growing alongside the path.

dndimg alt="Blackberry Way" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Blackberry Way SCP (May 2020) (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

The trees were lush and green, having grown back fast during the second full month of lockdown.

dndimg alt="Blackberry Way" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Blackberry Way SCP (May 2020) (5).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

The path continues straight on past the trees and cow parsley.

dndimg alt="Blackberry Way" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Blackberry Way SCP (May 2020) (6).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Approaching the gate at Formans Road. Beyond here was the Burbury Brickworks Nature Reserve.

dndimg alt="Blackberry Way" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Blackberry Way SCP (May 2020) (7).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Later coming back into the Blackberry Way. Headed down this grass path along the cow parsley.

dndimg alt="Blackberry Way" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Blackberry Way SCP (May 2020) (8).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

A bit of a tree canopy here.

dndimg alt="Blackberry Way" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Blackberry Way SCP (May 2020) (9).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Getting back to the Stratford Road entrance, and soon about to go back into the Greet Mill Meadow.

dndimg alt="Blackberry Way" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Blackberry Way SCP (May 2020) (10).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Burbury Brickworks Nature Reserve

The Burbury Brickworks is located between Formans Road in Sparkhill and the Cole Valley Business Park. Beyond this area you can walk around The Ackers (which is beyond Warwick Road, but I've not done The Ackers yet). It is a 13 acre site of a former brick making factory that existed here until the early 1960s. The River Cole runs alongside one part of the nature reserve. When the brickworks closed the area returned to it's natural state. It now has a marshland and young oak trees. This area also had a litter problem.

The Burbury Brickworks Nature Reserve sign at the Formans Road entrance. As with the Blackberry Way this Birmingham City Council sign says "Please help us to care for your local green spaces. No Dumping of Rubbish".

dndimg alt="Burbury Brickworks" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Burbury Brickworks SCP (May 2020) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

There was a pair of paths in the Burbury Brickworks. We too the right path.

dndimg alt="Burbury Brickworks" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Burbury Brickworks SCP (May 2020) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

The trees on this path were lush and green. Some cow parsley along the path as well.

dndimg alt="Burbury Brickworks" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Burbury Brickworks SCP (May 2020) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

First signs of rubbish alongside the path. Why can't people dispose of their rubbish properly and use the bin?

dndimg alt="Burbury Brickworks" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Burbury Brickworks SCP (May 2020) (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

So much takeaway rubbish around the benches that it attracted hungry crows looking for some food. The bin was also slanted a bit.

dndimg alt="Burbury Brickworks" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Rubbish in the Burbury Brickworks (May 2020).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

Nearing the gate close to the Cole Valley Business Park. Turned back after this. But did briefly pop out of the gate, and back in.

dndimg alt="Burbury Brickworks" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Burbury Brickworks SCP (May 2020) (5).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Beyond here is the Cole Valley Business Park. I would think you would have to walk or cycle past towards the Warwick Road to find the entrance to The Ackers, but I've not been there yet.

dndimg alt="Burbury Brickworks" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Burbury Brickworks SCP (May 2020) (6).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

On the walk back in the Burbury Brickworks found part of the River Cole.

dndimg alt="Burbury Brickworks" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Burbury Brickworks SCP (May 2020) (7).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

A wooden footbridge over a stream (I don't think this crosses the River Cole).

dndimg alt="Burbury Brickworks" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Burbury Brickworks SCP (May 2020) (8).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

On the Wetland Walkway saw this pond surrounded by trees. It's hard to believe that a brickworks was in this area until about 60 years ago.

dndimg alt="Burbury Brickworks" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Burbury Brickworks SCP (May 2020) (9).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

One of the fingerposts of the Shire Country Park was in the water. I'm not sure if it's still in there 2 and a half months on, but Council officials or park rangers needs to fish it out, and repair it.

dndimg alt="Burbury Brickworks" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Burbury Brickworks SCP (May 2020) (10).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

On the way out saw this NO DUMPING sign from Birmingham City Council. Your City Your Birmingham. Can locals and visitors please not dump their waste in the Shire Country Park. Dispose of your litter properly. Care for the environment.

dndimg alt="Burbury Brickworks" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/No dumping Burbury Brickworks (May 2020).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

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30 Jul 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Dorothy Round and Priory Park in Dudley

In the second Priory Park, Dudley post, we will look at other areas of the park other than the Priory Ruins (see my previous post). Priory Hall is also in the park and is used for weddings. Built in 1825 for the Earls of Dudley. There is a blue plaque here for Duncan Edwards (Manchester United player died in Munich crash of 1958). Also Dorothy Round bronze statue. Dudley born tennis player

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Dorothy Round and Priory Park in Dudley





In the second Priory Park, Dudley post, we will look at other areas of the park other than the Priory Ruins (see my previous post). Priory Hall is also in the park and is used for weddings. Built in 1825 for the Earls of Dudley. There is a blue plaque here for Duncan Edwards (Manchester United player died in Munich crash of 1958). Also Dorothy Round bronze statue. Dudley born tennis player


PRIORY PARK DUDLEY

Priory Park is located in Dudley, West Midlands. A 19 acre site it opened in 1932. The park includes the historic grounds of Dudley Priory. The park has a wood, playing fields and a lily pond. There is also tennis courts, basketball courts, a bowling green, a cricket area and a football pitch. The park was restored in 2013.

My visits were during January 2011 and October 2016 (usually an hour long bus ride from Birmingham to Dudley). Hopefully in the future when the West Midlands Metro line opens here, journey times from Birmingham will be faster.

January 2011

For my last Priory Park post on the Ruins of Dudley Priory click this link: The ruins of Dudley Priory in Priory Park, Dudley.

Continuing on from my Priory Ruins post (above) with Priory Hall and it's gardens.

Priory Hall is a Grade II listed building, built in 1825 in the Tudor Style. It was formerly the seat of the Earls of Dudley. Built of Ashlar. The Earl never lived here but allowed it to be used as a residence and offices for his principle agent of his Dudley estates. This view from the snow covered lily pond.

dndimg alt="Priory Park Dudley" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Priory Park Dudley (Jan 2011) (17).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

These days, Priory Halll is used as a training and conference centre and is also used for weddings held by Dudley Register Office.

dndimg alt="Priory Park Dudley" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Priory Park Dudley (Jan 2011) (18).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

One last look at Priory Hall before I left the park and walked back into Dudley Town Centre.

dndimg alt="Priory Park Dudley" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Priory Park Dudley (Jan 2011) (20).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

The road in the park from Priory Hall towards the roundabout at The Broadway and Priory Road.

dndimg alt="Priory Park Dudley" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Priory Park Dudley (Jan 2011) (19).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

This is the lily pond surrounded by an old stone wall. Frozen over by the snowfall at the time. The walls have been built a little bit like a castle.

dndimg alt="Priory Park Dudley" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Priory Park Dudley (Jan 2011) (13).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

To the back of the gardens was this shelter. It was built in the 1950s and re-built in the 1990s after suffering from vandalism. The roof suffered badly and this was not re-built. Although it does reduce it's usefulness from sheltering from the rain.

dndimg alt="Priory Park Dudley" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Priory Park Dudley (Jan 2011) (14).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

Wooden sculpture in the Priory Hall gardens. It was designed by Jonathan Mulvaney in 1992 and stands close to the lily pond. It is called People Group.

dndimg alt="Priory Park Dudley" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Priory Park Dudley (Jan 2011) (15).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

Another view of the wooden People Group sculpture from the back, looking towards the lily pond.

dndimg alt="Priory Park Dudley" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Priory Park Dudley (Jan 2011) (16).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

October 2016

More than 5 years after my last visit. This time mainly to see the statue of Dorothy Round and to find the blue plaque of Duncan Edwards.

Since my last visit, the park had been restored and these new sculpted gates installed. This was near the entrance at Priory Road and The Broadway. The decorative gateway was designed by Steve Field and installed in 2013.

dndimg alt="Priory Park Dudley" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Priory Park Dudley (Oct 2016) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Another angle of the same gates. By the looks of it, they illustrate Dudley's medieval history.

dndimg alt="Priory Park Dudley" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Priory Park Dudley (Oct 2016) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Looking back through the gates to the roundabout. Directions to Dudley Zoo and Castle. Also to the Black Country Living Museum.

dndimg alt="Priory Park Dudley" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Priory Park Dudley (Oct 2016) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

One more view of the Priory Park gates.

dndimg alt="Priory Park Dudley" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Priory Park Dudley (Oct 2016) (15).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

It was autumn, so there was a lot of leaves on the ground. Was a view from here towards Dudley Castle.

dndimg alt="Priory Park Dudley" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Priory Park Dudley (Oct 2016) (13).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

This was the zoomed in view of Dudley Castle from Priory Park. In ruins now, it was built from 1070 and in use until at least 1750. Built of limestone. Dudley Zoo is now located in those grounds. It's a Grade I listed building. For my West Midlands Castle post click here: Castles within the West Midlands region.

dndimg alt="Dudley Castle" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Dudley Castle (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Trees in the park with the leaves all over the lawn. Priory Park is the start of the Limestone Walk.

dndimg alt="Priory Park Dudley" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Priory Park Dudley (Oct 2016) (14).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

That day, there was a wedding on at Priory Hall. And saw a pair of wedding cars.

dndimg alt="Priory Park Dudley" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Priory Park Dudley (Oct 2016) (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

The wedding cars look old, but are probably modern builds to look like they are decades old. Didn't stay around here long as the wedding group was having their photos taken and didn't want to disturb them.

dndimg alt="Priory Park Dudley" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Priory Park Dudley (Oct 2016) (5).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Heading past the tennis courts as I started to look for the Dorothy Round statue.

dndimg alt="Priory Park Dudley" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Priory Park Dudley (Oct 2016) (6).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

And now to the Dorothy Round statue. It was called The Return of Dorothy Round and by the sculptor John McKenna, unveiled in 2013. She was a World Number 1 British female tennis player. She was born in Dudley. It is near the tennis courts.

dndimg alt="Priory Park Dudley" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Priory Park Dudley (Oct 2016) (10).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Close up view of the statue. Born in 1909 in Dudley, she died in 1982 in Kidderminster, aged 73. She won the Women's singles title at Wimbledon in 1934 and 1937. She also won the Australian Championships in 1935.

dndimg alt="Priory Park Dudley" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Priory Park Dudley (Oct 2016) (11).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Wide view of the Dorothy Round statue with the tennis courts.

dndimg alt="Priory Park Dudley" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Priory Park Dudley (Oct 2016) (12).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

This is The Pavilion. It is where you would find the blue plaque in memory of Duncan Edwards.

dndimg alt="Priory Park Dudley" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Priory Park Dudley (Oct 2016) (7).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

A front view of The Pavilion. There are public toilets to the left and right. It was originally built in the 1930s but was renovated around 2013. It now includes the rangers offices, toilets and an educational space.

dndimg alt="Priory Park Dudley" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Priory Park Dudley (Oct 2016) (8).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Here's the blue plaque for Duncan Edwards. A Footballer of genius. Born in Dudley in 1936, died in the Munich air disaster of 1958. He played for Manchester United and England. He grew up on the Priory Estate and attended Priory Primary School. The plaque was from Dudley Metropolitan Borough Council.

dndimg alt="Priory Park Dudley" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Priory Park Dudley (Oct 2016) (9).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

 

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Elliott Brown Green open spaces
27 Jul 2020 - Elliott Brown
Inspiration

Billesley Common and the Haunch Brook Pathways in the Shire Country Park

The home of Birmingham Moseley Rugby Club is at Billesley Common in the Shire Country Park. There is paths in the woods called the Haunch Brook Pathways. The area is classed as a SLINC (Site of Local Importance to Nature Conservation). There was also a new Wetland area developed in 2010. Billesley Common was first mentioned in 1774 as common land. With a big open field used for rugby.

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Billesley Common and the Haunch Brook Pathways in the Shire Country Park





The home of Birmingham Moseley Rugby Club is at Billesley Common in the Shire Country Park. There is paths in the woods called the Haunch Brook Pathways. The area is classed as a SLINC (Site of Local Importance to Nature Conservation). There was also a new Wetland area developed in 2010. Billesley Common was first mentioned in 1774 as common land. With a big open field used for rugby.


Billesley Common

 

Billesley Common is located on Yardley Wood Road and Haunch Lane in Billesley, and is a satellite park of the Shire Country Park. There is also an entrance off Hollybank Road if you walk down Chessetts Grove alongside the Haunch Brook. The Haunch Brook Pathways are located to the south of the common with entrances on Haunch Lane and on Yardley Wood Road. To the north of the common is the current home of Birmingham Moseley Rugby Club. (since 2005). Also nearby there is the Billesley Indoor Tennis Centre. Between them is the City of Birmingham Indoor Bowls Club. If you walk past these places, you end up on Wheelers Lane. Going past the new home of the Irish Centre (in what used to be the West Midlands Travel Birmingham Sports & Social Club). There is also a Friends of Billesley Common that cleans the parkland, gets the footpaths resurfaced and the footbridge repaired.

 

You can park your car on the layby on Yardley Wood Road near Billesley Common. Although whenever I've been down there, I've seen a lot of litter and flytipping (hopefully the Council or the Community Group can clean it up now that lockdown is eased even more).

History of Billesley Common

Billesley Common was first mentioned in the history books back in 1774 as common land. Billesley was a typical Anglo-Saxon name, possibly a corruption of Bills Leah and the Anglo-Saxon word for Bill's clearing. Leah means a woodland clearing and a woodland clearing is known to have existed in Billesley north of the Chinn Brook. It is thought that their used to be an Anglo-Saxon settlement on the higher ground near the present day Wold Walk.

A new Wetland area was developed in 2010, which was created so that flood water could be received from the Haunch Brook. A variety of wildlife is known to be around here.

Your main walk around Billesley Common would be around the Haunch Brook Pathways. Follow the Perimeter Walk around and over the Haunch Brook. There is also a path that leads up to Moseley Rugby Football Club, which has an entrance off Yardley Wood Road on Woodroofe Way.

South of Billesley Common is the Chinn Brook Nature Reserve (near Cocks Moors Wood Golf Club), and also the Chinn Brook Meadows (also called the Chinn Brook Recreation Ground). I will cover those areas in two future posts (so watch this space).

October 2016

My first walk around Billesley Common, on the Perimeter Walk and the Haunch Brook Pathways was in October 2016. I had kept seeing it over the years from the no 76 bus when it stops on Haunch Lane.

The entrance from Haunch Lane into Billesley Common. The noticeboard and information sign were on the right.

dndimg alt="Billesley Common" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Billesley Common SCP (Oct 2016) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Heading up the Haunch Brook Pathways into Billesley Common.

dndimg alt="Billesley Common" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Billesley Common SCP (Oct 2016) (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

A look at the Haunch Brook. Behind that fence is Yardley Wood Road.

dndimg alt="Billesley Common" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Billesley Common SCP (Oct 2016) (5).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

The path continues amongst the trees

dndimg alt="Billesley Common" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Billesley Common SCP (Oct 2016) (6).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

At this point you have the entrance to Yardley Wood Road to the right and the Perimeter Walk to the left.

dndimg alt="Billesley Common" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Billesley Common SCP (Oct 2016) (8).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Heading onto the Perimeter Walk.

dndimg alt="Billesley Common" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Billesley Common SCP (Oct 2016) (9).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

First view of the field, or the common. Various rugby goalposts up the hill and floodlights.

dndimg alt="Billesley Common" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Billesley Common SCP (Oct 2016) (11).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

A pair of rugby goalposts.

dndimg alt="Billesley Common" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Billesley Common SCP (Oct 2016) (12).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Was a blue sky with clouds that afternoon (it was just before 1pm on the 2nd October 2016).

dndimg alt="Billesley Common" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Billesley Common SCP (Oct 2016) (14).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Saw this sign about Bird Life on Billesley Common around the Haunch Brook Pathways.

dndimg alt="Billesley Common" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Billesley Common SCP (Oct 2016) (15).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Footbridge over the Haunch Brook.

dndimg alt="Billesley Common" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Billesley Common SCP (Oct 2016) (17).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

You can leave the Perimeter Walk and the Haunch Brook Pathways for the Hollybank Spinney. Just head towards Hollybank Road up Chessetts Grove (I've yet to check out the Hollybank Spinney).

dndimg alt="Billesley Common" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Billesley Common SCP (Oct 2016) (19).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Later back on Yardley Wood Road. Park your car up there for your walks around Billesley Common. It is up here though that I keep spotting rubbish and flytipping which is not nice to see.

dndimg alt="Billesley Common" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Billesley Common SCP (Oct 2016) (20).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

March 2020

A few days before the lockdown kicked in in March 2020, we headed for a walk around Billesley Common. Parking on Yardley Wood Road, we had a walk around the Perimeter Walk, before getting the car up to Swanshurst Park next.

Starting from the Yardley Wood Road entrance, the trees were looking a bit bare at the time.

dndimg alt="Billesley Common" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Billesley Common SCP (March 2020) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Heading up the path, the trees had yet to grow their leaves back.

dndimg alt="Billesley Common" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Billesley Common SCP (March 2020) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

View of the Haunch Brook behind the trees

dndimg alt="Billesley Common" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Billesley Common SCP (March 2020) (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Heading up the path near the common. The rugby field beyond towards Moseley Rugby Club.

dndimg alt="Billesley Common" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Billesley Common SCP (March 2020) (5).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Again I decided to do the Perimeter Walk this time so turned left at this fingerpost.

dndimg alt="Billesley Common" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Billesley Common SCP (March 2020) (7).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

This rugby goalpost was looking quite rusted.

dndimg alt="Billesley Common" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Billesley Common SCP (March 2020) (8).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Zoomed up to the play area / playground. When lockdown came in properly, all play areas and playgrounds had to be closed down.

dndimg alt="Billesley Common" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Billesley Common SCP (March 2020) (10).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Another pair of rugby goalposts, probably the same ones as I saw 4 years ago. Was crows on the common.

dndimg alt="Billesley Common" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Billesley Common SCP (March 2020) (12).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

A look at the trees from the Perimeter Walk. Strong sunlight.

dndimg alt="Billesley Common" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Billesley Common SCP (March 2020) (13).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

The footbridge again over the Haunch Brook.

dndimg alt="Billesley Common" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Billesley Common SCP (March 2020) (15).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

One of the views of the Haunch Brook from the footbridge.

dndimg alt="Billesley Common" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Billesley Common SCP (March 2020) (16).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

If you head this way you go to the Wetland area. The last time I saw that footbridge (July 2020), it looked broken, but was OK to cross when I went on the 20th March 2020.

dndimg alt="Billesley Common" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Billesley Common SCP (March 2020) (18).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Pair of wooden footbridges over the Haunch Brook. The one on the left doesn't have a handrail to hold onto, so be careful.

dndimg alt="Billesley Common" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Billesley Common SCP (March 2020) (19).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

July 2020

More recently went for an evening walk around Billesley Common. Again starting at the Yardley Wood Road entrance. But this time walking past Moseley Rugby Club and heading to the Wheelers Lane exit. Before going back in via Hollybank Road and Chessetts Grove. The walk was after 7pm in the evening on the 11th July 2020.

Heading up the Perimeter Path from the Yardley Wood Road entrance, there was bright sunshine in the evening, and the resulting photos of the common here came out a bit dark.

dndimg alt="Billesley Common" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Billesley Common SCP (July 2020) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Like other City parks, the grass here had been cut for social distancing walks, with some long grass kept.

dndimg alt="Billesley Common" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Billesley Common SCP (July 2020) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

A long cloud on the left hides the sun which was behind it in the evening. Imagine the history here.

dndimg alt="Billesley Common" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Billesley Common SCP (July 2020) (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

This time walking up the path towards Birmingham Moseley Rugby, past the rugby goalposts and floodlights.

dndimg alt="Billesley Common" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Billesley Common SCP (July 2020) (5).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

The view towards Birmingham Moseley Rugby Club.

dndimg alt="Billesley Common" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Billesley Common SCP (July 2020) (7).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Now on the path towards Wheelers Lane. The road into Moseley Rugby Club was called Woodroofe Way.

dndimg alt="Billesley Common" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Billesley Common SCP (July 2020) (8).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

The only part of the common not built on was to the right of the Rugby Club, Indoor Bowls Club and Indoor Tennis Centre.

dndimg alt="Billesley Common" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Billesley Common SCP (July 2020) (10).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

After the walk up Wheelers Lane and down Hollybank Road, I got to the Haunch Brook near Chessetts Grove, and saw this banner. Thank you NHS. Thank you key workers. In this together. Stay safe.

dndimg alt="Billesley Common" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Billesley Common SCP (July 2020) (11).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

The view of the Haunch Brook from the bridge on Hollybank Road. I will leave going into the Hollybank Spinney for a future time.

dndimg alt="Billesley Common" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Billesley Common SCP (July 2020) (12).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Back onto the Haunch Brook Pathways around the Perimeter Walk and I saw this Little Egret landing on this tree branch!

dndimg alt="Billesley Common" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Billesley Common SCP (July 2020) (14).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

There had been a lot of growth of the bushes and the trees in the 4 months since my last visit here. This was on the Wetland area side.

dndimg alt="Billesley Common" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Billesley Common SCP (July 2020) (16).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Beyond the Wetland towards the common.

dndimg alt="Billesley Common" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Billesley Common SCP (July 2020) (17).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Heading out of the Haunch Brook Pathways up the path towards Haunch Lane. Leaves on the trees fully grown back.

dndimg alt="Billesley Common" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Billesley Common SCP (July 2020) (19).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Getting back to the Haunch Lane exit / entrance. The bus stop there is for the 18 and 76 bus routes. Drivers of the 76 usually change here. Just had to walk around to Yardley Wood Road for the car ride home.

dndimg alt="Billesley Common" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Billesley Common SCP (July 2020) (20).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

I went to Hollybank Spinney on the 23rd July 2020. Look out for a post on it in the future in the Shire Country Park project (it's part of the Haunch Brook Pathways and is very short).

But first I will need to do posts on the Chinn Brook Meadows and the Chinn Brook Nature Reserve.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

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Elliott Brown Green open spaces
20 Jul 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

The Shakespeare Garden at Lightwoods House & Park

I've only managed to go into the Shakespeare Garden once at Lightwoods House & Park. That was during November 2017, after the house and other structures in the park were fully restored. It was usually open daily from 10am until 4pm. But on my last visit to the park in June 2020 it was closed (probably due to the pandemic and lockdown). Would be nice to go into it again soon

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The Shakespeare Garden at Lightwoods House & Park





I've only managed to go into the Shakespeare Garden once at Lightwoods House & Park. That was during November 2017, after the house and other structures in the park were fully restored. It was usually open daily from 10am until 4pm. But on my last visit to the park in June 2020 it was closed (probably due to the pandemic and lockdown). Would be nice to go into it again soon


The Shakespeare Garden at Lightwoods Park & House

Some history about The Shakespeare Garden from the official Lightwoods Park & House website.

The garden was established in 1915 within the house's former walled gardens. The restored gardens was named after the bard William Shakespeare, and the shrubs were named after the playwrights works. The garden was designed on an Elizabethan theme. The garden is open to the public and is a fantastic venue for a variety of events. The idea for a Shakespeare Garden was conceived by Councillor G. Johnson, who was then Chairman of the Parks Committee, and was opened by the Lord Mayor, Alderman W. Bowater on the 22nd July 1915. The Elizabethan themed garden has a "knot garden", herb and fruit garden, containing many of the plants mentioned in Shakespeare's plays.

The garden was formerly the kitchen garden to Lightwoods Hall which at one point was the residence of Sir Francis Galton.

 

2011

My first glimpse of the Shakespeare Garden was from outside the gate during March 2011. It was not open on the day of my visit, and was before it was restored. So could only have a look through the locked gate at the time.

Shakespeare Garden sign on the wall from the outside.

dndimg alt="Shakespeare Garden" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Shakespeare Garden Lightwoods House (March 2011) (1).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

The ornate gate to the garden was padlocked, so couldn't go in (might have been the weekend so would have been closed any way).

dndimg alt="Shakespeare Garden" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Shakespeare Garden Lightwoods House (March 2011) (2).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

Flower bed outside the Shakespeare Garden to the left of the gate. Lots of yellows and some pinks and reds here.

dndimg alt="Shakespeare Garden" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Shakespeare Garden Lightwoods House (March 2011) (3).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

A look through the gate. Was some daffodils growing on the left near the big tree.

dndimg alt="Shakespeare Garden" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Lightwoods Park (March 2011) (5).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

Trying to get the view of the garden to the left of the big tree.

dndimg alt="Shakespeare Garden" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Shakespeare Garden Lightwoods House (March 2011) (4).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

2017

A visit to Lightwoods Park in November 2017. The house was restored, and the Shakespeare Garden was open, so I went in and had a look (was probably a weekday).

Being that it was late autumn, and almost winter at the time, the trees were mostly bare of leaves.

dndimg alt="Shakespeare Garden" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Lightwoods Park (Nov 2017) (9).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

A main path down the middle of the garden towards those trellises.

dndimg alt="Shakespeare Garden" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Lightwoods Park (Nov 2017) (10).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

In the middle was the Knot Garden with the box hedges. You can see Lightwoods House from here which is to the left.

dndimg alt="Shakespeare Garden" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Lightwoods Park (Nov 2017) (11).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

In 2012 during the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II this green plaque was unveiled about John Tradescant (1608 - 1662) who was a Royal Gardener. There was also a stone sculpture of him to the left of the plaque. From the Smethwick Local History Society.

dndimg alt="Shakespeare Garden" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Lightwoods Park (Nov 2017) (12).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

A lot of bright sunshine under the trellises towards the fountain in the centre.

dndimg alt="Shakespeare Garden" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Lightwoods Park (Nov 2017) (13).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

A close up look at the fountain. Was some benches around it to sit on.

dndimg alt="Shakespeare Garden" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Lightwoods Park (Nov 2017) (14).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

The far end of the garden down the main path. Lightwoods House to the right.

dndimg alt="Shakespeare Garden" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Lightwoods Park (Nov 2017) (15).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Another part of the box hedges in the Knot Garden.

dndimg alt="Shakespeare Garden" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Lightwoods Park (Nov 2017) (16).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

2020

Early June 2020, and my first time back in Lightwoods Park for almost 3 years. While there, went past Lightwoods House and the Shakespeare Garden. But the gate was locked. Probably due to the pandemic / lockdown (I would assume that it has since reopened since my last visit).

Looks like they had installed a new gate here. I must have walked through it in 2017, so what happened to the old gate?

dndimg alt="Shakespeare Garden" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Shakespeare Garden Lightwoods House (June 2020) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

With the new gate being locked, I again had to look at the garden through it. The grass was looking a bit long.

dndimg alt="Shakespeare Garden" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Shakespeare Garden Lightwoods House (June 2020) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Long grass on the border to the right. Flowers of pink and red colours.

dndimg alt="Shakespeare Garden" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Shakespeare Garden Lightwoods House (June 2020) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

I couldn't see many more flowers to the left, just all looking green towards the box hedges to the far left.

dndimg alt="Shakespeare Garden" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Shakespeare Garden Lightwoods House (June 2020) (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Outside was this sign with the opening hours of 10am to 4pm daily. No dogs are allowed in the garden, nor is bikes, scooters or skateboards. Children must be supervised.

dndimg alt="Shakespeare Garden" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Shakespeare Garden Lightwoods House (June 2020) (5).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Hopefully the garden was allowed to reopen as of July 2020. I look forward to going into it again in the future.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

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