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GreenSpacesAndUs

Protecting our green open spaces

Green Spaces and Us is all about promoting and supporting social value, providing a shared digital space where people can showcase what they do and can together make a difference by helping to protect their environment.

Launch date: June 2019
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Green open spaces
Displaying until 01 Sep 2021 - FreeTimePays
Featuring

Love our parks - get involved!

As Lockdown rules start to enable more people to enjoy their parks and green spaces, we all want to ensure that these wonderful places of natural beauty are protected for all to enjoy.  This community collective will share some of the brilliant initiatives running across the UK and show just how, together, we can make a difference for the benefit of all.  Connect with us.

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Love our parks - get involved!





As Lockdown rules start to enable more people to enjoy their parks and green spaces, we all want to ensure that these wonderful places of natural beauty are protected for all to enjoy.  This community collective will share some of the brilliant initiatives running across the UK and show just how, together, we can make a difference for the benefit of all.  Connect with us.


Over the next month and for the remainder of 2020, we will be growing our reach and pull together information and details on all the great work being carried out across communities as they collectively protect their parks.  

This will grow into a massive 'community-led' resource for people with a shared interest and passion for their local parks and green spaces.  

Here's just a few of the ideas and initiatives we will be telling you more about so we can share and get more people actively involved.

Litter picking groups - they do a fantastic job.  We'll connect you with your local group.

Art & Culture Trail.  We'll help you set up your trail and showcase your parks.

Walking clubs. We'll connect you and bring in more friends.

Park angels.  Volunteering with a difference.  We'll tell you more.

Creativity and green spaces collide.  Let's look at how art, music, photography and creativity in all its forms can help promote and protect our parks. 

Parks and mental health.  A walk, ride or jog in the park can do so much for your mental health.

There's something for everyone.

Connect with us and help us protect our parks. 

 

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60 passion points
Green open spaces
3 hours ago - Elliott Brown
Gallery

The historic 18th Century Leasowes Park in Halesowen

There is a large park near Halesowen called Leasowes Park, close to Lapal in the Metropolitan Borough of Dudley. The Dudley No 2 Canal passes through the park. Although sections needs restoring. Designed by the poet William Shenstone between 1743 and 1763. The landscape ranks in importance along with Blenheim and Stowe. Halesowen Golf Club is based in this wonderful park.

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The historic 18th Century Leasowes Park in Halesowen





There is a large park near Halesowen called Leasowes Park, close to Lapal in the Metropolitan Borough of Dudley. The Dudley No 2 Canal passes through the park. Although sections needs restoring. Designed by the poet William Shenstone between 1743 and 1763. The landscape ranks in importance along with Blenheim and Stowe. Halesowen Golf Club is based in this wonderful park.


Leasowes Park

My visit to Leasowes Park in Halesowen was during February 2018. Depending on which bus I got via Quinton in Birmingham, I would have got off near the eastern end of the park, but later got another bus back from the western end. I would have got the 11C to Bearwood, and waited for a 9 or X10 on Hagley Road West (opposite Lightwoods Park) towards Halesowen. I think I ended up getting a 9 to Leasowes Park, and later an X10 back into Birmingham.

 

Now for some history (taken from Wikipedia). The park, also known as The Leasowes, was and estate in Halesowen, now in the Metropolitan Borough of Dudley, but historically in the county of Shropshire. It contained a house and gardens. It is the home of Halesowen Golf Club and is a Grade I listed park on English Heritage's Register of Parks and Gardens.

The parkland was designed by the 18th century poet William Shenstone between 1743 and 1763. After Shenstone's death in 1763, the house and gardens were taken over by Edward Horne, who demolished Shenstone's house and built a new one on the same site in 1776. There was also a walled garden. Future US Presidents Adams and Jefferson visited The Leasowes in 1786.

The property was sold in 1789 to Major Francis Halliday who made major changes to the house and parkland. He died in 1794 and Edward Butler Hartopp became the owner of the estate in 1795. Until it transferred to Charles Hamilton in 1800. Then in 1807 it passed into the hands of Matthias Attwood. But by the 1820s the park was in a state of ruin and desolation.

The Anstey College of Physical Education was housed here between 1897 and 1907. Halesowen Golf Club bought part of the site in 1906. Halesowen Council bought The Leasowes in 1934 (since taken over by Dudley Metropolitan Borough Council). Since then the estate has been managed as a public park, with part of the site leased to the golf club.

 

OK, now it's time to go back to my February 2018 visit to Leasowes Park. I would have probably got off the no 9 bus on Manor Lane, then walked up Kent Road, until I entered the park at this gate.

A Leasowes Park noticeboard. Not too readable with this glass on top of it, or it might have been the light from the sunshine.

Heading along a muddy path past the trees and the fences.

From the path at the top, there was some good views towards Halesowen Town Centre.

And beyond Halesowen Town Centre was the Hagley Obelisk to the far right (on the top of the distant field).

Zoom in to the Hagley Obelisk. Which is Grade II* listed. It is ¾ of a mile from Hagley Hall. Dates to the mid 18th century and made for George, First Lord Lyttleton, of sandstone ashlar.

I got to these steps which would take me down to the next level of the park.

The steps heads sharply down the hill.  There is other paths to get down there if you don't fancy using these steps.

It was a nice sunny day in February, as the path winds around past the trees.

A reminder that a golf club is nearby.

BEWARE DANGER FLYING GOLF BALLS

At Halesowen Golf Club a yellow flag pole in one of the golf holes on the golf course.

The first look at the Beechwater Pool. There is more lakes to see in this landscape.

There was streams leading to Beechwater Pool. As a lady walks her dog on the path to the left.

A stunning view of Beechwater Pool

Now a blue flag pole at Halesowen Golf Club.

One of the entrances to Halesowen Golf Club.

Passing the golf clubhouse known as The Leasowes. Dudley MBC have placed a blue plaque here for William Shenstone. The house is Grade I listed in the Queen Anne style. Built of Stucco with three bays and two storeys. William Shenstone was born here (in 1714) but not necessarily in this house (if this was the rebuilt house of 1776 and the old one knocked down after Shenstone's death by Horne).

Walking past the clubhouse. This way to the Professional's Shop and Locker Rooms.

The walk continues through Halesowen Golf Club.

A sign about the restoration of the Walled Garden in The Leasowes. News from 2015 onwards. A group of volunteers have taken to restore the walled garden after years of neglect and vandalism (since 2014). Hopefully it is fully restored by now, but they welcome donations to help with the restoration. Good luck.

Onto the next lake (or pond). This one isn't named.

Now heading towards the Priory Pool. This is also known as the Breaches Pool.

A pair of swans in the Priory Pool (Breaches Pool).

The Priory Pool (Breaches Pool) looks lovely here.

Saw a domestic duck in the Priory Pool (Breaches Pool).

A climbing frame for children, part of the playground / Play Area. Kids can climb up the roped net and over the wooden logs.

A look at The Leasowe Play Area. Back when it was fine to use playgrounds. One day it will be safe to use them again in the future. It was close to the Leasowes Lane Car Park.

Getting close to the Dudley No 2 Canal, also known as the Lapal Canal. This sign with information about the Lapal Canal Trust. Who are trying to restore the canal from Halesowen to Selly Oak.

Just before I left the park, a quick look at the Dudley No 2 Canal near the car park. Then exiting onto Mucklow Hill. Where I would catch the X10 bus back into Birmingham.

The Lapal Canal near Mucklow Hill. The section at this end needs restoring through a tunnel near an industrial estate. But the canal beyond here is in use though. It's just the section from The Leasowes to Selly Oak that has to be restored, and this will take years to get it reconnected to the Worcester & Birmingham Canal.

Look out for more park posts coming soon in the not too distant future around the Black Country including:

  • Priory Park, Dudley
  • Dartmouth Park, West Bromwich
  • Mary Stevens Park, Stourbridge
  • West Park, Wolverhampton

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

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60 passion points
Environment & green action
3 hours ago - Elliott Brown
Gallery

The ford on Green Road in the Shire Country Park

There is a ford on Green Road in Hall Green where the River Cole crosses it in the Shire Country Park. On foot you would pass it at the shallow ends from the Sarehole Mill Recreation Ground into the Greet Mill Meadow. There is a bridge for pedestrians, dog walkers and cyclists to use. Cars drive through the river. Sometimes gets flooded in heavy rain.

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The ford on Green Road in the Shire Country Park





There is a ford on Green Road in Hall Green where the River Cole crosses it in the Shire Country Park. On foot you would pass it at the shallow ends from the Sarehole Mill Recreation Ground into the Greet Mill Meadow. There is a bridge for pedestrians, dog walkers and cyclists to use. Cars drive through the river. Sometimes gets flooded in heavy rain.


On the Millstream Way in the Shire Country Park is a ford at Green Road in Hall Green, Birmingham. The River Cole flows through the road, and usually cars drive through it when the water levels are low. There is a footbridge for pedestrians to use, also for dog walkers and cyclists. People with wellies walk into the river as there is a path into the Sarehole Mill Recreation Ground. For other people who don't want their clothes and shoes to get wet, there is the dry path. One end of the ford is near the Greet Mill Meadow, a walk which leads to the Stratford Road at the Sparkhill / Springfield border.

2009

The first time I walked into the Shire Country Park was in April 2009, when I started taking photos around Birmingham. I got these photos of the River Cole at the Green Road ford. There is a measuring stick showing how high the water is getting.

The footbridge is on the left on Green Road, close to the Greet Mill Meadow entrance.

The River Cole flows into Green Road from the Greet Mill Meadow and continues onto Sarehole Mill and Cole Bank Road.

2018

The next time I walked to the ford at Green Road was during March 2018. This was after the recent rain or snow, so I expected the river level of the Cole to be higher. After all there is always news about a car getting stuck in the river, or under the bridge! This is on the Sarehole Mill Recreation Ground side.

The stick was showing it was only 1 foot high at this point (the water level of the River Cole).

There was some men standing on the bridge, but other than that the River Cole seemed shallow and passable at the time.

In the middle of Green Road, you can see how shallow the River Cole was, but best to get onto the pavement before a car comes

Personally I would think it would be best to drive on Cole Bank Road or Stratford Road, rather than take your car through the ford, especially if the river level is too high.

The other side of the River Cole in the Greet Mill Meadow, looked quite high on this side, compared to on the road side.

Saw one car going through, but I didn't get it going through the ford. I think I next walked back to Cole Bank Road along Sarehole Road at the time.

2020

In February 2020, after popping down to Sarehole Mill for the Bakehouse open day during Storm Dennis, I walked into the Sarehole Mill Recreation Ground, while it was wet and raining and headed to check out the ford on Green Road.

The ford wasn't as flooded as I expected it to be, but was too unsafe for cars to drive through it that day.

From this side on the footbridge, the water levels were looking a bit high.

The view of the River Cole towards the Sarehole Mill Recreation Ground. Definetely not worth driving your car into this during a storm!

The Ford warning sign said: CAUTION DO NOT CROSS.

A close up of the Ford sign with CAUTION DO NOT CROSS.

I also saw a man walking his dog while he stopped to let his dog have a drink in the Cole. After this, I walked back to Cole Bank Road along Sarehole Road.

Now on lockdown in April 2020. We walked from the Sarehole Mill Car Park, and we found this path between the River Cole and Coldbath Brook. It leads towards the ford on Green Road.

You can see the footbridge on Green Road, but without wellies, and not wanting to get my shoes or jeans wet, turned back and got onto the main path in the Sarehole Mill Recreation Ground Instead (via the Sarehole Mill Car Park).

For the first time, I managed to get a photo of a car driving through the ford on Green Road, giving off a bit of a splash!

Also saw a cyclist on Green Road, and near Sarehole Road. I would assume that he went into the Greet Mill Meadow.

Saw this sign, Try your brakes. We headed up Green Road to Wake Green Road to get into the Moseley Bog for a daily walk on lockdown.

One last look at the ford. It was registering as about half a foot, or less.

One month on as lockdown restrictions have been eased. It's now May 2020. And we had come back from a walk in the Greet Mill Meadow. Caught this car driving through the ford on Green Road, with a spectacular splash through the River Cole! Just had to go back into the Sarehole Mill Recreation Ground and we would be back in Sarehole Mill Car Park.

Over the coming months there will be more posts from around the Shire Country Park, so watch this space. Also check out the gallery for the photos.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

 

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60 passion points
Rivers, lakes & canals
27 May 2020 - Elliott Brown
Inspiration

The Breeding Pool and Boating Lake at Cannon Hill Park

Here we look at the main lake in Cannon Hill Park. Starting with the Breeding Pool, we then go onto the main Boating Lake. Usually attracting the usual gulls, geese, swans, ducks etc. The lake closest to The MAC is used as a Boating Lake. In recent years there has been Swan Lake Boats close to The MAC. This replaced the old paddle boats that used to be in the lake until 2016.

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The Breeding Pool and Boating Lake at Cannon Hill Park





Here we look at the main lake in Cannon Hill Park. Starting with the Breeding Pool, we then go onto the main Boating Lake. Usually attracting the usual gulls, geese, swans, ducks etc. The lake closest to The MAC is used as a Boating Lake. In recent years there has been Swan Lake Boats close to The MAC. This replaced the old paddle boats that used to be in the lake until 2016.


In this post we look at the main lake in Cannon Hill Park. Called the Boating Lake. But at the southern end is the Breeding Pool. This lake runs parallel to the River Rea and Queens Ride. You would find The MAC to the north of the Boating Lake (rebuilt in 2009-10). Swan Lake Boating opened in 2016 along with a Fun Park from Green Space Leisure. Halfway in the middle of the lake is a metal bar which various birds usually perch on (mostly gulls). Paths on both sides for walking, walking your dog, pushing your childs pushchair, running and cycling. Even kids in scooters, or rollerskates or skateboards etc.

 

Breeding Pool

The Breeding Pool in Cannon Hill Park seen during November 2009. It is near the Ornamental Bridge. Mostly gulls at this end at the time.

The bridge is Grade II listed and dates to 1875. Made of red bricks and stone dressings.

Gulls around the Breeding Pool near the bridge.

The bridge leads to the Queens Ride.

This view of the Ornamental Bridge if you were coming from the Queens Ride end. There is also a bridge over the River Rea, but just has those painted metal railings. One of the paths from the Rea Valley Route is to the right (leads to Holders Lane Woods).

It was foggy / misty at the Breeding Pool during April 2018.

Just about see the tree island in the middle of the lake at the time.

The ornamental bridge seen during August 2019. Some geese in there at the time.

In February 2020, there was a black Great Cormorant in the middle of the bird bars, with a line of gulls either side of it.

The Great Cormorant was an unusual site in Cannon Hill Park.

But was nice to see a bird that you don't normally see here, other than the usual gulls. There was at least two Great Cormorant there that day.

In May 2020 as the lockdown restrictions were eased. Passed the Breeding Pool when I saw a Canada geese family with their newborn babies.

So cute! The proud Canada geese parents and their newborn gosling in the Breeding Pool.

There was about 7 baby gosling there on the banks of the pool. They will grow fast.

View of the Ornamental Bridge towards Queens Ride. Rare for it to be empty like this, but it was in the morning before more people arrived for their daily form of exercise in the park.

Boating Lake

In April 2011, and a view up the Boating Lake towards The MAC.

A pair of Canada geese near the edge of the lake.

Always loads of Canada geese around here.

There is a bar in the middle of the lake between the boating side and the Breeding Pool. Usually birds perched on the bars.

There is paths both sides of the lake to walk or cycle around.

The MAC was rebuilt in 2009 and reopened in a new building in 2010.

View of The MAC with the Boating Lake.

In January 2013, snow had fallen all over Birmingham and that included at Cannon Hill Park. The Boating Lake near The MAC was completely frozen and covered in snow and ice.

Even the paths were icy at the time. There may have been birds at the far end of the lake, but not at this end at the time.

Paddle boat on the Boating Lake in December 2013 as a gull flew past it.

Swan Boats seen in June 2016. This opened in May 2016 and is called Swan Lake Boating. Close to The MAC. Replaced the old paddle boats that used to be used here.

Swan paddle boats for four people to paddle about in the lake. It's part of the Fun Park from Green Space Leisure. Small rollercoaster nearby.

The summer drought during July 2018 when grass all over the City had lost it's green and had gone a dry yellowy colour.

At the time the Birmingham Thai Festival was being set up on the lawn near the lake. It was held on the weekend of the 28th and 29th July 2018. It hadn't rained for a month and it was quite hot.

This view of the Swan Boats during May 2019. You can see where they store the orange life jackets behind.

A pair of Swan Boats seen in use in the Boating Lake during August 2019. Seems like there is room for 4 people were boat and they have to wear orange life jackets.

In February 2020, I saw all these gulls flying about above the Boating Lake towards The MAC.

It was quite a sight to see all the gulls flying all over the place. Could even see a floodlight at Edgbaston Cricket Ground behind The MAC.

Slightly more calm now as the gulls came to land in the lake to the left of The MAC.

The May 2020 walk past the Boating Lake, while it was quite on lockdown (before the crowds arrived in the morning). The path was empty, and the grass mown.

Saw another Canada geese family near the lakeside. At least three baby Gosling here. How cute! And some ducks.

No boats are allowed to be used during lockdown, so just the birds in the lake (and fish if there are any under the water).

But for your daily form of exercise, you can run or ride a bike (or just walk). The play area near The MAC is of course closed.

People socially distancing on the benches, while a man rides his bike past the Artists Studios site (was the Peoples Postcode Lottery Arena at The MAC).

Swan Lake Boating is closed during the pandemic / lockdown period we are in. The boats are 4 seaters. The Peoples Postcode Lottery Arena is being replaced next to The MAC by an Artists Studio

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

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60 passion points
Environment & green action
26 May 2020 - Elliott Brown
Inspiration

From the Birmingham Nature Centre to the Birmingham Wildlife Conservation Park

Located on the Pershore Road in Edgbaston near Cannon Hill Park is the Birmingham Wildlife Conservation Park. This was a rebrand from the former Birmingham Nature Centre in 2014. A name it had since about 1974. Before that it was Birmingham Zoo from 1964 until it closed in 1973. The building used to be the Birmingham Natural History Museum from 1953, until the zoo opened a decade later.

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From the Birmingham Nature Centre to the Birmingham Wildlife Conservation Park





Located on the Pershore Road in Edgbaston near Cannon Hill Park is the Birmingham Wildlife Conservation Park. This was a rebrand from the former Birmingham Nature Centre in 2014. A name it had since about 1974. Before that it was Birmingham Zoo from 1964 until it closed in 1973. The building used to be the Birmingham Natural History Museum from 1953, until the zoo opened a decade later.


Birmingham Wildlife Conservation Park

On the Pershore Road in Edgbaston, is part of Cannon Hill Park that has either been a natural history museum or a zoo. What is now called the Birmingham Wildlife Conservation Park has had many different names in the past.

The Birmingham Natural History Museum opened in what is now the entrance building (ticket office and shop) in 1953. This was established by the Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery whose natural history department established a museum on the site. But it didn't last too long. In 1964 the building and the land nearby was turned into the Birmingham Zoo by the Dudley Zoological Society. The zoo suddenly closed in 1973. Only for Birmingham City Council to reopen it as the Birmingham Nature Centre in 1974. It kept this name for 40 years until it was rebranded as the Birmingham Wildlife Conservation Park in 2014. Which it is still called today.

Some of the information above taken from Birmingham Nature Centre - mapping museums.

The building itself dates back to the 1920s or 1930s when it was originally built as the Birmingham Branch Art Gallery and Museum, at Cannon Hill Park. The building was designed by A Edgerton Leeson. It must have still been open until the early 1950s, when the Natural History Museum replaced it.

It was built on the site of Pebble Mill Farm. Before the farm this was the site of Pebble Mill, which was once a fulling mill. It was a water powered mill that existed from the 16th century. It gave it's name to the Pebble Mill land where the BBC used to be (now developed with new hospitals and a care home). The mill became a blade mill in the 17th century. It was converted to grinding corn in 1842. A dairy farm opened in 1890, with cow fields near the River Rea. The Bourn Brook was diverted at the beginning of the 20th century. The farm was demolished in 1921.

Information above taken from A Brummie's Guide to Birmingham on the Nature Centre.

 

I first took photos of the Birmingham Nature Centre building during the snow of December 2010, from the Pershore Road in Edgbaston.

At the time the Nature Centre might have been closed, although the doors were open.

It still had a sign above the door saying Museum. Probably dating from it's time as a Natural History Museum or before that as an Art Gallery and Museum.

Some close up details of the inter war years museum building, which is now the entrance to what was then the Nature Centre.

There is a set of doric columns at the entrance to the Nature Centre (formerly a museum).

Also a ramp with railings to help people with wheelchairs or pushchairs, or hard of walking get in.

An earlier view of the Nature Centre with a Christmas Tree out front.

A Nature Centre sign / sculpture with all the months of the years.

It also had animals in it's design. The name in the middle has since been covered over with a Birmingham Wildlife Conservation Park sign (from 2014 onwards).

The back of the museum building. There is a door here, but it was not open. I would think that there would be a door to the side into the then Nature Centre.

The Queens Ride leads from Cannon Hill Park to the Nature Centre. With the Boy Scouts War Memorial on the left. The fence to the left runs along the site of the Nature Centre. For more on the war memorials of Cannon Hill Park, go to this post: Memorials in Cannon Hill Park . Tyre tracks in the snow from cyclists heading to and from the Pershore Road and the park.

After a look at the entrance building to the Nature Centre, I headed into Cannon Hill Park for a look around the park while it was covered in snow. In the years since, I never got around to paying for a visit around the Nature Centre, but have been back around this area outside many times over the years.

 

In July 2013, I only really got photos of these colourful flower beds outside of the Nature Centre. This one pointing towards Pershore Road and over to Pebble Mill Road (to the far left of here).

This colourful flower bed pointing in the direction of the railings of the Nature Centre with those printed photos of animals.

A pair of flower pots surrounded by logs. On the drive in front of the Nature Centre. The Pershore Road to Selly Park to the left.

Another set of flower pots surrounded by logs close to the roadside. The Pershore Road into Edgbaston and the City Centre to the right of here.

From the Pershore Road, I got this photo through the railings of these emu's (or ostriches). It would be nice one day after lockdown ends, to pay for a visit, or go with a group of other photographers. Anyone up for it when things go back to normal?

Well overgrown as I saw this view of a bridge that crosses the Bourn Brook. It joins up to the River Rea beyond the Nature Centre.

Got some new photos of the Birmingham Nature in August 2014 when it had by this point been renamed to the Birmingham Wildlife Conservation Park. Admission Charges to the left and Opening Times to the right. (To date I still haven't paid for a visit around the park).

All of these new signs went up outside in the car park for the re-named Birmingham Wildlife Conservation Park.

These signs for the Birmingham Wildlife Conservation Park points the direction to the car park & main entrance. At the time someone had put put a poster about a Missing Dog. I hope they found their dog at the time (6 years ago now).

But have different photos of animals on them. Probably to get young children excited about their visit.

Another one for the Entrance to the Car Park. The gate closes at dusk.

My only night time photo was from January 2018, as I got off the bus early on the Pershore Road and took this Christmas Tree, while their was Christmas fairy lights on the Birmingham Wildlife Conservation Centre. This was just after 5pm in the evening, before a walk up the Pershore Road.

Another view of the bridge over the Bourn Brook from the bridge on the Pershore Road during April 2018. For many years there was flood defence works on this side and on the Pebble Mill side which took years to complete. And one of the paths into Cannon Hill Park, only just reopened.

During the summer drought in July 2018, grass lawns all over the City had gone from the normal green to a yellow colour. Here the flower beds were looking quite pink at the time. The car park to the park is in the distance to the right. The Pershore Road to the left.

The other pink flower bed closest to the railings of the Wildlife Conservation Park. By now they had loads of large printed photos of animals for visitors to see before going into the park. The grass was so dry at the time.

Finally in January 2019, I saw this Land Rover Defender parked outside of the entrance of the Birmingham Wildlife Conservation Park. It was from the Park Ranger Service. Could see it from Pebble Mill Road before I walked onto the Pershore Road.

Maybe one day when things are back to normal, someone could organise a group photo visit around the Birmingham Wildlife Conservation Park. Maybe someone at Birmingham We Are, or one of those Facebook groups such as Brumtography. I have no childhood memories of going to the Birmingham Nature when I was little. Could have gone in the 1980s and I remember nothing about it.

But in recent years, I been to London Zoo with my then camera (in 2010) and even went to a Zoo in Lyon, France (2017). I've seen the birds in cages at the Birmingham Botanical Gardens. Did go to the Birmingham Sealife Centre a couple of times after it opened in the mid 1990s, but didn't have a camera at the time. And only have exterior views from the late 2000s and into the 2010s.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

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60 passion points

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