Curtis Gardens, Birmingham - A Wonderful open space!

Curtis Gardens is situated on the Fox Hollies Road in Acocks Green, Birmingham. Formerly the estate of Fox Hollies Hall (demolished in 1937).


Curtis Gardens is a green space with paths and trees along the Fox Hollies Road between Hall Green and Acocks Green in Birmingham.

Curtis Gardens

Curtis Gardens (January 2010). Photography by Elliott Brown

 

There is paths and trees alongside the Fox Hollies Road.

Curtis Gardens

Curtis Gardens (January 2010). Photography by Elliott Brown

 

There is also a Children's Play Area.

Curtis Gardens

Play Area at Curtis Gardens (May 2020). Photography by Elliott Brown

 

Three tower blocks stand on the former site of Fox Hollies Hall and are called: Homemeadow House, Hollypiece House and Coppice House.

Curtis Gardens

Homemeadow House, Hollypiece House and Coppice House from Curtis Gardens (January 2010). Photography by Elliott Brown

 

History of Curtis Gardens

Formerly the estate of Fox Hollies Hall. On this site off the Fox Hollies Road in Hall Green stood a grand manor house called The Hollies. A farm was recorded in 1275 as being called Atte Hollies on this site. It was recorded as being in Acocks Green, but it later became Hall Green. By 1626 the Fox family bought the farm and it became known as Foxholleys. The farm eventually belonged to Zaccheus Walker, who rebuilt the house in grand style, calling it The Hollies. It was demolished in 1937.

Fox Hollies Hall

Fox Hollies Hall c. 1900. Public Domain. Taken from The Walker era

 

The Acocks Green Heritage Trail history boards were installed in 2016, this is board 8 out of 8.

Curtis Gardens

Acocks Green Heritage Trail at Curtis Gardens (August 2016). Photography by Elliott Brown

 

The three blocks of flats were built in the 1960s were named after the three fields on the Foxholleys estate: Coppice, Hollypiece and Homemeadow. Hence you get Coppice House, Hollypiece House and Homemeadow House. The flats occupy the site of Zaccheus Walker's mansion which was approached through an avenue of trees which still stand on Greenwood Avenue. Only a gate pillar, and a base of another, remain of the entrance to the long-demolished hall.

Curtis Gardens

Homemeadow House, Hollypiece House and Coppice House from Curtis Gardens (January 2010). Photography by Elliott Brown

 

Greenwood Avenue is now a dual carriageway in Acocks Green, that leads from the Fox Hollies Road to the Shirley Road, and has houses on both sides. It ends at Norland Road where Fox Hollies Forum is now.

Greenwood Avenue

Greenwood Avenue, Fox Hollies (October 2017). Photography by Elliott Brown

 

Curtis Gardens was named after local Labour Party activist John Curtis. Permission to build on the land was granted in 1959, and started in 1960. The park opened in 1965.

Curtis Gardens

Towards the Play Area at Curtis Gardens (January 2010). Photography by Elliott Brown

 

Gateposts at Curtis Gardens

The gateposts at Curtis Gardens are the only original thing left from Fox Hollies Hall. Located on Fox Hollies Road. The metal gates are relalively new having been installed in the early 2000s. One of the pillars had been knocked over years ago by a Council vehicle, but was reinstated, along with new gates and benches, as similar to the original ones. This was around 2004-05.

Curtis Gardens

Gates and Gateposts at Curtis Gardens (January 2010). Photography by Elliott Brown

 

Concrete Fish Sculpture

This is directly ahead of the old gatepost from Fox Hollies Road. In 2015 it was granted Grade II listed status. It was by John Bridgeman and was probably made in the 1960s.

Curtis Gardens

Fish sculpture at Curtis Gardens (January 2010). Photography by Elliott Brown

 

Hall Green Little Theatre

Hall Green Little Theatre is near Curtis Gardens and close to Pemberley Road in Acocks Green. They have been producing quality drama since 1950, and it run by committed volunteers. They usually produce 10 productions per season.

Hall Green Little Theatre

Hall Green Little Theatre (February 2014). Photography by Elliott Brown

 

Winter at Curtis Gardens

Curtis Gardens

Curtis Gardens (February 2021). Photography by Elliott Brown

 

Spring at Curtis Gardens

Curtis Gardens

Curtis Gardens (April 2020). Photography by Elliott Brown

 

Seasonal flowers at Curtis Gardens

Crocuses come up at the end of February each year at Curtis Gardens.

Curtis Gardens

Crocuses at Curtis Gardens (February 2019). Photography by Elliott Brown

 

Bluebells can be seen in late April in Curtis Gardens each year.

Curtis Gardens

Bluebells at Curtis Gardens (April 2020). Photography by Elliott Brown

 

Project dates

04 Feb 2021 - On-going

Passions

History & heritage, Photography, Environment & green action
Housing, People & community, Green open spaces

Contact

(for further information)

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