Parks and Open Spaces - Birmingham loves them!

In and around Birmingham, there is so much to enjoy with great parks, open spaces, canals, nature and wildlife. There are so many spaces for people to visit and enjoy.


Public parks emerged in the 1830s to improve the health of the working classes living in the over-crowded conditions of the rapidly growing industrial town. It was hoped that parks would reduce disease, crime, and social unrest, as well as providing “green lungs” for the city and areas for recreation.

Birmingham is extremely proud of its parks and its open spaces.

With 571 parks covering a combined area of 14 square miles, this is more green open space than any other equivalent sized European city including Paris. 15 of Birmingham’s parks have received the prestigious Green Flag Award.

 

Cannon Hill Park, Birmingham

Cannon Hill Park is the most popular park in Birmingham covering 250 acres. It consists of formal, conservation, woodland and sports areas and was opened to visitors in 1873.

Cannon Hill Park. Photography by Karl Newton

Cannon Hill Park. Photography by Daniel Sturley

Winter at Cannon Hill Park. Photography by Pete Davies

 

Handsworth Park, Birmingham

Handsworth Park is a lovely open space comprising 63 acres of landscaped grass slopes, including a large boating lake and a smaller pond fed by the Farcroft and Grove Brooks.

The Boating Lake at Handsworth Park (September 2019). Photography by Elliott Brown

 

Lickey Hills Country Park, Birmingham

Lickey Hills has a complex and interesting geology which has created a variety of habitats. These include woodlands, heathland and grassland, which are home to an incredible diversity of wildlife.

Beacon Wood Nature Reserve, Lickey Hills. Photography by Jay Mason-Burns

 

Lickey Hills Photography by Chris Fletcher

 

Cotteridge Park, Birmingham

Cotteridge Park is one of the Victorian parks in the city, set in 22 acres. There's a 2 kilometre walking route through the park.

Cotteridge ParkSquirrel at Cotteridge Park  (September 2019). Photography by Elliott Brown

 

Sunset & Moonlit Parks, Birmingham

They were designed as part of a local regeneration project. There is Moonlit Park this is home to a play area for children and has a wildflower meadow, while Sunset Park has an outdoor events space.

Sunset & Moonlit Park (July 2019). Photography by Karl Newton

 

   Kings Heath Park, Birmingham 

The park was originally called Victoria Park is centred on a house, built in 1832. In 1880 the house was bought by John Cartland, a wealthy industrialist.

Cycling in Kings Heath Park  with Dad.  Photography by Christine Wright

 

Fox Hollies Park, Birmingham

The Fox Hollies is named after the Fox Hollies Hall. There's a 2 kilometre walking route & 40 acres of beautiful park land. There is also a lake where fishing is available.

Fox Hollies Park. Photography by Tammie Naughton

 

Knowle Park, Solihull

The park was once the grounds of Longdon Hall, and is located close to the historic Knowle Village. This area was once part of the Forest of Arden in medieval times.

Knowle ParkDaffodils at Knowle Park (March 2019). Photography by Elliott Brown

 

The Vale Village, University of Birmingham

The Vale Village is part of the University of Birmingham, it is set in a relaxing conservation area with its own lake. A beautiful spot.

Beautiful scene at The Vale.  Photography by Peter Leadbetter

 

Leasowes Park, Halesowen

Leasowes Park is a historic landscape. It was designed by the poet William Shenstone between 1743 and 1763.

Leasowes ParkPriory Pool at Leasowes Park (February 2018). Photography by Elliott Brown

 

Winterbourne House & Gardens, Birmingham

Winterbourne House is one of Birmingham's great Gems. It was originally built as the family home of John & Margaret Nettlefold from 1903.

The beautiful Winterbourne House and Gardens. Photography by Barry Whitehead

 

Manor Farm Park, Birmingham

Manor Farm park was opened to the public in 1951, it was once the home of George & Elizabeth Cadbury who lived at Northfield Manor House.

Manor Farm ParkThe lake at Manor Farm Park (November 2018). Photography by Jay Mason-Burns

 

Edgbaston Reservoir, Birmingham

The Reservoir is a popular spot for walkers, joggers and is host to boat clubs and other water sports.Edgbaston Reservoir was built in 1827 by Thomas Telford as a top up for the Birmingham canal system and is still used for that purpose today.

Edgbaston ReservoirEdgbaston Reservoir  (June 2019). Photography by Karl Newton

 

Botanical Gardens, Birmingham

The Birmingham Botanical Gardens opened to the public in 1832.  The gardens are Grade II listed and is the home to the Birmingham Botanical and Horticultural Society which was founded in 1829.

The Birmingham Botanical Gardens in September 2016 - Photography by Daniel Sturley

 

Sutton Park, Birmingham, West Midlands

The heathland in Sutton Park has existed since at least since Roman times. The park is a National Nature Reserve and is one of the largest urban parks in the United Kingdom.  Most of Sutton Park is a National Nature Reserve and is one of the largest urban parks in the United Kingdom.

  Autumn reflections, Sutton Park. Photography by Chris Fletcher

 

Swanshurst Park, Birmingham

Most of Swanshurst Park is a natural heathland, making the park an important nature conservation habitat for the city. The council bought the fields in 1922 to lay out the park. They were from Ivyhouse Farm and Swanshurst Pool.

Swanshurst Park

Moseley New Pool in Swanshurst Park (November 2019). Photography by Karl Newton

Enjoy our freature including links to maps, trails, a wonderful gallery of photography, articles from our community and so much more.  See why Birmingham is so proud of its parks and open spaces. 

 

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Green open spaces
03 Dec 2020 - Elliott Brown
Inspiration

12 must visit parks in Birmingham in 2021

There is literally hundreds of parks in Birmingham, but here is a quick look at 12 parks you could visit in 2021 at any time of the year for a walk, cycle, or taking your dog for a walk etc. From the well known parks such as Kings Heath Park and Cannon Hill Park, to the less well known such as Kings Norton Park and Manor Farm Park. So many to choose from.

Related

12 must visit parks in Birmingham in 2021





There is literally hundreds of parks in Birmingham, but here is a quick look at 12 parks you could visit in 2021 at any time of the year for a walk, cycle, or taking your dog for a walk etc. From the well known parks such as Kings Heath Park and Cannon Hill Park, to the less well known such as Kings Norton Park and Manor Farm Park. So many to choose from.


Click the links below to go to the projects and view the posts. All parks are reachable by cycle or bus. Some by train and tram. Many of these parks used to be country estates before being acquired by the Council from the late 19th or early 20th Century.

 

Cannon Hill Park

Located between Moseley and Edgbaston on Edgbaston Road and Russell Road. There is also entrances from the Pershore Road. Cannon Hill Park opened to the public back in 1873, on land donated by Louisa Ryland. It is probably the most popular park in Birmingham with lakes, playgrounds and a fun fair. The Midlands Art Centre is also based here. Various memorials are located in this famous park.

Bus routes: 1, 1A, 35, 45 or 47.

 

Kings Heath Park

Probably the second most popular park in Birmingham is Kings Heath Park. Located on Vicarage Road and Avenue Road in Kings Heath. The park was home to the TV Garden, and there is a Tea Room located in a house built in 1832 for an MP, William Congreve Russell. The land and house later ended up in the Cartland family in 1880, and they sold it in 1900s. Eventually the local council took control, before Kings Heath became a part of Birmingham in 1911. Today there is several play areas in the park, plus a couple of ponds.

Bus routes: 11A, 11C, 27 or 76.

 

Highbury Park

Located between Kings Heath and Moseley, with one entrance near the Kings Heath High Street. It was the estate of Joseph Chamberlain who lived at Highbury Hall until his death in 1914. Highbury Park also has entrances on Moor Green Lane, and one near a gatehouse close to Yew Tree Lane. From Dad's Lane and Shutlock Lane, there is a back entrance to the park also leading to a car park. The park opened to the public in 1930. The park has a couple of ponds that you can see.

Bus routes: 27, 35, 50 or 76.

Trains: A new Kings Heath Station could open in the future by 2022 (the original station closed in 1941).

 

Kings Norton Park

This park is located down the Pershore Road South in Kings Norton. It was opened to the public in 1924. There is a car park located on Westhill Road. The River Rea flows through the park, although you can't see it. The park features a play area near the Westhill Road entrance, and a skate park. Not too far from the old Kings Norton Village. Part of the Rea Valley Route, and on the National Cycle Network route no 5.

Bus routes: 18, 19, 45, 47 and 49.

Trains: Kings Norton Station on the Cross City Line up the hill in Cotteridge.

 

Handsworth Park

This park is located between Hamstead Road and Hinstock Road in Handsworth. Also with entrances on Holly Road and Grove Road. Nearby is the Church of St Mary, where James Watt and Matthew Boulton are buried. Handsworth Park has at least two lakes. A railway line crosses half way through the park (it was the site of Handsworth Wood Station until 1942). Originally known as Victoria Park, it opened to the public in the 1880s. A sculpture was installed in the park called SS Journey by Luke Perry.

Bus routes: 16, 61 or 101.

Trams: In walking distance of Soho Benson Road or Winson Green Outer Circle tram stops.

 

Grove Park

This park is located on Harborne Park Road in Harborne. Grove Park has been a public park in Birmingham since 1963. The southern end of the park is on Mill Farm Road towards the Kenrick Centre. Historically the park was the grounds of The Grove, which was an 18th century Georgian house. One of Birmingham's first MP's Thomas Attwood lived at The Grove from 1823 to 1846. The house was later rebuilt for another Birmingham MP, William Kenrick in 1877-78. He died there in 1919. His son Alderman W. Byng Kenrick donated the estate to the City (he died in 1962). The house was demolished by Birmingham City Council in 1963. The park has a play area and a lake.

Bus routes: 10S, 11A, 11C or 76.

 

Bournville Park

This small park located in Bournville is on Linden Road, and is disected by The Bourn. Directly opposite the world famous Cadbury chocolate factory. The parks goes towards Selly Oak Road and Oak Tree Lane. There is a play area close to Linden Road. Close to Bournville Village Primary School. There is also a tennis court and a bowling green.

Bus routes: 11A or 11C, 27 or 48.

Trains: Bournville Station on the Cross City Line.

Rookery Park

Up to Erdington for this park. Rookery Park is located on Wood End Road and Kingsbury Road. The site of Rookery House, which was being restored the last time I saw it. The Grade II listed house was built in the 18th century, and was originally known as Birches Green House. Was the home of Abraham Spooner and his descendants from 1730. Various different owner occupiers during the 19th century. The local council took over the land in the late 19th century, then became part of Birmingham from 1911. There was several derelict toilets in the park in urgent need of restoration. As well as a play area towards the Western Road exit.

Bus routes: 11A or 11C or X14.

Trains: In walking distance of Erdington Station on the Cross City Line.

Selly Oak Park

This park is located in Selly Oak on Gibbins Road and Harborne Lane, close to the Selly Oak Bypass and the site of the Lapal Canal. The park has a play area and plenty of paths for walking. One route along the site of the lost canal goes towards Weoley Castle. Selly Oak Park opened in 1899 on land donated by the Gibbins family. More land was added to the park during the 20th century. The park is maintained by The Friends of Selly Oak Park. You can find carved wooden sculptures around the park, by Graham Jones.

Bus routes: 10S, 11A, 11C or 48.

Trains: In walking distance of Selly Oak Station on the Cross City Line.

Cotteridge Park

This park can be accessed from the Persore Road via a bridge (over the Cross City Line) from Breedon Road. The park also runs up Franklin Road towards Bournville. The park has a play area and tennis courts. Plus a skate park and basketball court. Cotteridge Park had a Sons of Rest building, but it was demolished in the 1990s. The Friends of Cotteridge Park was started up in 1997. A small community building was built between 2019 and 2020.

Bus routes: Not far from the 11A, 11C, 45, 47 or 48.

Trains: Bournville or Kings Norton Station on the Cross City Line.

Manor Farm Park

Over to Northfield for this park, located on the Bristol Road South. Although it is known as White Hill in the area close to Bournville. The park was the site of the Northfield Manor House, which was damaged by fire in 2014 (never seen it myself). It was the home of George and Elizabeth Cadbury, from 1890, until his death in 1922 and her death in 1953. The park was opened to the public in 1951. Also home to a small lake. A wooden picnic barn built in 1894, was sadly destroyed by arsonists in 2017 and has been demolished. The Friends of Manor Farm Park hope to restore the outbuildings in the park.

Bus routes: 44, 48, 61, 63, 76 or 144.

Sheldon Country Park

This large Country Park is located between the Coventry Road in Sheldon towards Marston Green and Birmingham Airport. The Westley Brook flows through the park. There is an Airport viewing area that is good for plane spotting, as well as The Old Rectory Farm. Sheldon Country Park is split into sections, from Coventry Road to Church Road. Then from Church Road towards the Airport Viewing Area. The Hatchford Brook also flows into the park joining the Westley Brook not far from the runway of the airport.

Bus routes: 60, X1, X2, 72 or 73.

Trains: Marston Green Station on the West Coast Mainline (Birmingham New Street to Coventry line).

Similar post here on the 11 bus Outer Circle.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown. Can be found on Twitter: ellrbrown.

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70 passion points
Environment & green action
21 Nov 2019 - Karl Newton
Gallery

The wonderful colour changes of Autumn.

Karl 'people with passion' shares his wonderful Autumnal photography. The beautiful rich vibrant colours of Autumn.

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The wonderful colour changes of Autumn.





Karl 'people with passion' shares his wonderful Autumnal photography. The beautiful rich vibrant colours of Autumn.


 Birmingham - Worcester Canal, Edgbaston

 

Swanshurst Park, Birmingham

 

Moseley Park and Pool, Birmingham

 

 Birmingham - Worcester Canal, Edgbaston

 

Swanshurst Park, Birmingham

 

 Birmingham - Worcester Canal, Edgbaston

 

Temple Row, Birmingham

 

Brueton Park, Solihull, West Midlands

 

Cannon Hill Park, Birmingham 

 

Moseley Park and Pool, Birmingham

 

Grand Union Canal, Acocks Green, Birmingham

 

Cannon Hill Park, Birmingham

 

Autumn at Cannon Hill Park, Birmingham

 

Autumn at Cannon Hill Park, Birmingham

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30 passion points
Environment & green action
05 Aug 2019 - Elliott Brown
Inspiration

Parks around the no 11 Outer Circle Bus Route: from Kings Heath Park to Swanshurst Park and beyond

If you catch the 11A or 11C buses as frequently as I do, then you would know that there is plenty of parks to visit around the Outer Circle. Here we will look at some of the parks along the route. Not all visited at the same time of course. There is parks in Kings Heath, Bournville, Selly Oak and other places along the route.

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Parks around the no 11 Outer Circle Bus Route: from Kings Heath Park to Swanshurst Park and beyond





If you catch the 11A or 11C buses as frequently as I do, then you would know that there is plenty of parks to visit around the Outer Circle. Here we will look at some of the parks along the route. Not all visited at the same time of course. There is parks in Kings Heath, Bournville, Selly Oak and other places along the route.


Swanshurst Park

This is the park I normally pass first heading up the 11C on Swanshurst Lane in Moseley. Would also normally pass it heading down in the 11A from Kings Heath. Swanshurst Park is the home of the Moseley New Pool. Where you would see many Canada geese, swans, ducks etc in the pool. They are also sometimes to be found on the grass bank near Swanshurst Lane. Photo from March 2011 when Zippos Circus was in town.

Kings Heath Park

I normally get the 11C towards Kings Heath Park, and the 11A back from it. The park is on Vicarage Road a short walk from the Town Centre / High Street of Kings Heath. It's next door to King Edward VI Camp Hill Schools. Photo from February 2018, around a month after the Magical Lantern Festival had vacated the park, and the grass had to grow back (it moved back to the Botanical Gardens for Xmas 2018).

Cotteridge Park

This park isn't visible from the roads that the 11A or 11C buses goes on, but if you get off on the Pershore Road or Watford Road in Cotteridge, this park is a short walk away. Seen below in early August 2018, I would get off the 11C on the Pershore Road, then walk up Breedon Road and cross the bridge over the Cross City Line into Cotteridge Park. You can exit / enter also on Franklin Road. Head left towards Bournville and Linden Road, or right towards Bournville Station and Mary Vale Park.

Bournville Park

This small park in Bournville is near the Linden Road and is opposite the Cadbury Factory playing field. This view from August 2012 shows The Bourn that flows through the park. The park has a bowling green and a tennis court. The park ends at Selly Oak Road and Oak Tree Lane. You can continue your walk into the Valley Parkway along the Merritts Brook Greenway. Also suitable for cyclists.

Selly Oak Park

You can get off the 11A or 11C buses on the Harborne Lane in Selly Oak to visit this park. It is also near Gibbins Road. My first visit (photo below) during June 2012. Selly Oak Park is close to the site of the Lapal Canal, and over the years a section in the park has been restored, but the canal is not yet ready to be completed to be reconnected to the Worcester & Birmingham Canal. Recently the new Selly Oak Shopping Park opened during autumn / winter 2018. If you continue beyond the park along Gibbins Road, you end up near Lodge Hill Cemetery.

Grove Park, Harborne

I first went to Grove Park in Harborne during May 2012. You get off the bus on the Harborne Park Road. The park is also bordered by Mill Farm Road, Grove Lane and Old Church Road. In November 2018 I found the blue plaque of Alderman W. Byng Kenrick, which states that he gave the Grove Estate to the City. It was near the Kenrick Centre on Mill Farm Road. This park also has a pond.

Lightwoods Park, Bearwood

This park is usually the furthest that I normally go on the 11C, getting off the bus on Lordswood Road. Bearwood is within Sandwell, and is part of Smethwick. Lightwoods Park was managed by Birmingham City Council hence the likes of the bandstand (pictured restored as of November 2017) having the coat of arms of Birmingham. Management of the park was handed over to Sandwell Metropolitan Borough Council in 2010. In recent years Lightwoods House has been fully restored, as has the Shakespeare Garden nearby. The park is on the Hagley Road West, not far from Edgbaston and Harborne.

Summerfield Park

I once ended up in Summerfield Park after completing my second half walk of the Harborne Walkway during February 2016. The path leads to the Dudley Road near Winson Green. The 11A / 11C do go past here, although I've never gotten those buses this far around. But I have been past on the 87 towards Smethwick and Dudley. The park is also close to the Edgbaston Reservoir and the Birmingham Canal Navigations Mainline (as well as the railway between Birmingham and Wolverhampton). Icknield Port Road runs down one side of the park. Near the top right corner is a derelict Police Station building. Was the former Summerfield Police Station before they moved to new building on Icknield Port Road.

Rookery Park, Erdington

During my early January 2019 walk from Bromford Bridge up the Bromford Lane towards Wood End Road in Erdington, I went past Rookery Park on my way towards Erdington Town Centre. Didn't pop in, but took this shot on the way past. Don't usually get the 11A as far as Erdington, but around the December 2018 / January 2019 period, I decided to see how long it would take to get the bus on the Outer Circle to Erdington. It is faster though to get one of the Express buses back into the City Centre, or the train from either Chester Road or Erdington Station.

Old Yardley Park

Another park not visible from the 11A or 11C bus routes, but you can get off the bus on Stoney Lane in Yardley near Blakesley Road to walk to this park. One way is to Blakesley Hall, and the other leads to Old Yardley Village via Church Road. This photo from my January 2017 visit to Old Yardley Park in a stones throw view of the spire of St Edburgha's Church. The park is bordered by Church Road and Queens Road in Yardley.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown.

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50 passion points
Environment & green action
08 Jul 2019 - FreeTimePays
Gallery

Wonderful Parks & Green Spaces around Birmingham & The West Midlands!

Above photograph - Courtesy Damien walmsley

With Birmingham winning a place on a new multi-million pound initiative to enhance the future of our parks and green spaces, let's take a look at the amazing open spaces we already have across Birmingham & the West Midlands!

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Wonderful Parks & Green Spaces around Birmingham & The West Midlands!





Above photograph - Courtesy Damien walmsley

With Birmingham winning a place on a new multi-million pound initiative to enhance the future of our parks and green spaces, let's take a look at the amazing open spaces we already have across Birmingham & the West Midlands!


Cannon Hill Park is a park located in Birmingham, It's the most popular park in the city, covering 250 acres consisting of formal, conservation, woodland and sports areas.

Flower bed with tulips at Cannon Hill Park.

Photo Courtesy Elliott Brown

 

The Memorial to the Sousse Terror Attack Victims in Cannon Hill Park.

Photo Courtesy Daniel Sturley

 

The Midland Art Centre (Mac) is situated within Cannon Hill Park, it's a hub of creativity and learning.

Photo Courtesy Elliott Brown

 

Sandwell Valley Country Park, is an award winning Green Flag park, in the heart of the West Midlands. 

Forge Mill Lake at Sandwell Valley. There's something to do for everyone, from  a quiet walk, a keen ramble, or just to relax and reflect, with 660 acres to walk round, you can explore the pleasant surroundings through woods, farmland and by pools and streams.

Photo Courtesy Karl Newton

 

You can see the historic feature range Priory Ruins, There is so much to see and do, fun for all the family!

The RSPB Nature Centre provides a further gateway to the Country Park, with a visitor centre, & a bird hide.

Photo Courtesy Karl Newton

 

Highbury Park is a large green space bordering Moseley and Kings Heath. Just a few miles from Birmingham's City Centre, the park is one of Birmingham's many green gems.

Highbury Park -  Joseph Chamberlain was the former resident of Highbury Hall.

Photo Courtesy Daniel Sturley

 

Photo Courtesy Christine Wright

 

Original pear and apple pergola in the Highbury Hall kitchen garden.

Photo Courtesy Christine Wright

 

Winterbourne House & Gardens is one of Birmingham's great Gems and, amongst other things, is home to over 6,000 plant species from around the world.  

 

The beautiful gardens at Winterbourne.

Photo Courtesy Barry Whitehead

 

Japanese bridge which allows safe passage from one side of the Rock Garden pool to the other.

Photo Courtesy Peter Leadbetter

 

The Nutwalk, Winterbourne.

Photo Courtesy Christine Wright

 

Winterbourne House is a unique heritage attraction and is set within 7 acres of beautiful botanic gardens. It is adjacent to Edgbaston Pool.

Photo Courtesy Jay Mason - Burns

 

Kings Heath Park is a large green space in Kings Heath and covers 35 acres. Located just a couple of miles from Birmingham's City Centre, the park has gained Green Flag status.

A seat beside the pool at the beautiful Kings Heath Park, surrounded by bright maples.

Photo Courtesy Christine Wright

 

Kings Heath House and Cartland Tea Rooms 

Photo Courtesy Christine Wright

 

 Heather in bloom in Kings Heath Park.

Photo Courtesy Christine Wright

 

Lickey Hills Country Park is a country park in Birmingham

Lickey Hills has a complex and interesting geology which has created a variety of habitats. These include woodlands, heathland and grassland, which are home to an incredible diversity of wildlife.

Lickey Hills has a Green Flag Award and is designated as a Country Park.

Lickey Hills has a number of marked walking trails of varying lengths and difficulty. There are many paths and tracks that can be followed.

Photo Courtesy Chris Fletcher

 

Photo Courtesy Karl Newton

18 hole golf course at Lickey Hills golf course.

Photo Courtesy Barry Whitehead

 

There’s a toposcope in a small “fort” on the top of the hill which points out the direction to notable landscape features you can see from Beacon Hill. 

Photo Courtesy Karl Newton

 

 

 

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60 passion points
Environment & green action
12 Apr 2019 - FreeTimePays
News & Updates

Robert the Cat "gets the cream" at Walsall Road Allotments, Birmingham

New images have been released of how Perry Park and areas around the Alexander Stadium including Walsall Road Allotments will look both during and after the 2022 Commonwealth Games.

Take the full post to read this great example of how Community can connect and can influence decision making. Great to see the Council listening to Community.

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Robert the Cat "gets the cream" at Walsall Road Allotments, Birmingham





New images have been released of how Perry Park and areas around the Alexander Stadium including Walsall Road Allotments will look both during and after the 2022 Commonwealth Games.

Take the full post to read this great example of how Community can connect and can influence decision making. Great to see the Council listening to Community.


Following a well-run campaign led by Betty Farruggia, site manager at the Walsall Road Allotments, Birmingham City Council has announced that the allotments will play a key part in the legacy of Perry Park as a result of holding the 2022 Commonwealth Games.

The decision has been taken that relocation of the Allotments will not be necessary, much to the delight of one of the Allotments residents, Robert the cat.

In fact, the focus is on protecting the heritage of the allotments and it will form part of a public space that promotes and supports wellbeing and leisure in and across Birmingham.  

Birmingham City Council Leader, Cllr Ian Ward, said:

 "I'm delighted to reassure Robert the cat and his friends that the Walsall Road Allotments will be protected.

"The residents, businesses and community groups of Perry Barr should be at the very heart of Birmingham 2022 and we want to ensure that they feel the benefits of the Commonwealth Games.

“So, before making any final decisions about the wider Alexander Stadium site, we’ve spent a number of weeks listening to the plotholders and other interested parties about the current and future use of the allotments and the surrounding area.

"They are clearly passionately committed to Walsall Road allotments and that's the type of community spirit that we'd like to see replicated right across the city in 2022 and beyond."

Betty Farruggia, Site Manager of the Walsall Road Allotments said:

“I am elated to hear that the allotment site will be retained.

“We will work closely with the council in the months and years ahead to facilitate the smooth running of the Games and further develop the strong feeling of community that we have here and in the wider area.

“I would like to thank everyone for their support and the council who have listened to our comments and concerns.”

The Masterplan for the Games and for how Alexander Stadium fits into the plan for redefining green space in Perry Barr will be put to the City Council’s Cabinet later in the year. Early ideas and thoughts, however, including a naturescape, promenade and running trails.

Council Leader, Cllr Ian Ward, has added:

“Engaging local communities and improving the health and wellbeing of our citizens, as well as attracting multi-million-pound investment and improvements in housing, transport infrastructure, and community facilities, are key drivers to us hosting the Commonwealth Games and shaping the legacy beyond.

“We are very excited by these early plans and drawings showing us what could be possible to make this area one that is focused on not just a sport but also wellbeing and health living. It truly will be a destination venue that I hope the citizens of Perry Barr will be benefit from and be proud of for many years to come.”

We want to hear about your Green Action initiative. Click here and go see what we're doing at GreenActionWithYou.  

Click here to tell us about your Green Action initiative and let's together help protect our environment.

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70 passion points
Green open spaces
12 Mar 2019 - Laura Creaven
News & Updates

Green Heart Festival Opening Weekend

The University of Birmingham is celebrating the redesigned ‘Green Heart’ area of the campus with a free weekend festival on Saturday 8 and Sunday 9 June 2019.

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Green Heart Festival Opening Weekend





The University of Birmingham is celebrating the redesigned ‘Green Heart’ area of the campus with a free weekend festival on Saturday 8 and Sunday 9 June 2019.


The redesigned area of University of Birmingham’s campus, known as the ‘Green Heart’, is the result of two years work redeveloping the area to open up the campus in the way that the Founders imagined it would be.  The new parkland in the centre of the University’s historic campus measures over over 12 acres, providing a multi-use space for performances, events and markets, as well as bringing wild flowers and native plants to campus.

The Green Heart will also open up new pedestrian and cycle routes, allowing students, staff and visitors to move across campus with ease.  This will improve air quality, provide shade and create a place of peace, whilst developing zoned lighting to balance campus safety with minimising light pollution.

The Green Heart Festival Opening Weekend will bring a range of outdoor music performances, with music from University of Birmingham musicians and range of street food and drink on offer.  There will also be the opportunity to explore hands-on exhibits which highlight the recent research from the University.

To read more about University of Birmingham’s Green Heart, visit their website at https://uobgreenheart.com/

And for more information on Green Heart Festival Opening Weekend, visit the University of Birmingham’s website.

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50 passion points
Environment & green action
09 Jan 2019 - The Friends of Kings Heath Park
Activity for you

Park Woodland Days in Kings Heath Park

Go and join the Rangers and The Fiends of Kings Heath Park in enhancing the park using traditional methods to improve and maintain the woodland.
16 Feb 2019 to 16 Feb 2019
10.30am - 12.30pm
Kings Heath Park - Birmingham

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80 passion points
Environment & green action
09 Jan 2019 - FreeTimePays
Gallery

Great green spaces around Birmingham - this at Warley Woods

Warley Woods amongst Birmingham's great green spaces - Elliott's been out hunting for Big Sleuth bears.

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53 passion points
Environment & green action
09 Jan 2019 - FreeTimePays
Gallery

Birmingham 'city of trees' in West Midlands great green spaces feature

Birmingham, the City of Trees in photography from Elliott and others covering great green spaces across the West Midlands - here Highbury Park near Moseley & Kings Heath. 

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53 passion points
Environment & green action
09 Jan 2019 - Daniel Sturley
Gallery

City of Trees in green spaces feature

Daniel with his City of Trees pic taken from Dudley Castle a couple of years back - we feature great green spaces across the West Midlands.

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53 passion points
Environment & green action
09 Jan 2019 - The Friends of Kings Heath Park
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Tree Planting Event - Kings Heath Park

Join Birmingham Trees for Life and The Friends of Kings Heath Park to plant trees in Kings Heath Park. People need to bring/wear suitable warm outdoor clothing, boots/wellies and gloves for planting trees. Generally, stuff they don't mind getting muddy. Spades and trees supplied! Children are welcome - accompanied by a responsible adult. Meet outside the cafe in Kings Heath Park.
19 Jan 2019 to 19 Jan 2019
10.30am to 12.00noon
Kings Heath Park - Birmingham

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Environment & green action
31 Aug 2017 - FreeTimePays
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Autumn is on its way!

Stunning photography of Birmingham & West Midlands - this over at Lickey Hills. Autumn is on its way! Photo by Chris Fletcher.

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