Handsworth Park, Birmingham - A wonderful open space!

Handsworth Park is a lovely open space comprising 63 acres of landscaped grass slopes, including a large boating lake and a smaller pond fed by the Farcroft and Grove Brooks.


Handsworth Park is located on Hamstead Road in Handsworth.

Handsworth Park

Hamstead Road gates at Handsworth Park (September 2019). Photography by Elliott Brown

Holly Road is to the south. The Soho Railway Line splits the park in half. The western side of the park is on Grove Lane. Hinstock Road and Church Lane takes the park to the north west corner.

To the north east side of the park is St Mary's Church where James Watt, Matthew Boulton, William Murdoch and the founders of Aston Villa FC are buried.

St Mary's Church Handsworth

The churchyard of St Mary's Chruch can be seen from Handsworth Park (September 2019). Photography by Elliott Brown

 

The park is on the no 16 bus, where you can get off on the Hamstead Road.

The park comprises 63 acres of landscaped grass slopes, including a large boating lake and a smaller pond fed by the Farcroft and Grove Brooks, flower beds, mature trees and shrubs with a diversity of wildlife.

The Boating Lake at Handsworth Park (September 2019). Photography by Elliott Brown

 

History of Handsworth Park

Handsworth Park (originally called Victoria Park) was created from the grounds of The Grove, an estate bought for the community in 1887. Grove House was soon called Park House. It probably had facilities like a Cricket Ground. From 1889 to 1901 the park was enlarged to it's current size of 63 acres including the land to the east of the railway.

The boating lake was created in 1897, as well as a Boating Pavilion and the Park Lodge. In the 20th century the park was used for many events including theatrical and musical celebrations held on the Bandstand which first appeared in the park in 1891.

In the 1920s the Birmingham Civic Society designed a new sunken garden near the Grove Lane entrance, and in 1930 a 'Sons of Rest' shelter was built to be enjoyed by local retired men. The park had losses too. In 1939 as part of the war effort, the iron gates and railings were taken away.

Park House survived until the early 1980s when it was replaced by the large, new Leisure Centre.

History of Handsworth Park (September 2019). Photography by Elliott Brown

 

The Austin Lines Fountain

The fountain dates to the late Victorian period, but the fountain itself has long since been removed, and now only the Victorian Drinking Canopy remains.

Victorian Drinking Fountain Canopy at Handsworth Park (September 2019). Photography by Elliott Brown

 

The Park Lodge

This building was built in 1897 and is close to the gates at Hamstead Road. It can also be seen from the other side of the Boating Lake.

Handsworth Park Lodge

The Park Lodge at Handsworth Park (September 2019). Photography by Elliott Brown

 

The Big Sleuth Birmingham 2017

At least two of the painted bears can be still found in Handsworth Park, years after the trail had ended.

Sun Guardian was created by Goosensi working with Friends of Handsworth Park and the Handsworth Community. It was close to the Holly Road entrance to the park.

Handsworth Park Big Sleuth

Sun Guardian (created by Goosensi) at Handsworth Park (September 2019). Photography by Elliott Brown

 

Well Active Bear was created by Mark Copplestone and Jennie Saunders working with Birmingham Wellbeing Service. Seen outside of the Handsworth Wellbeing Centre.

Handsworth Park Big Sleuth

Well Active Bear (created by Mark Copplestone and Jennie Saunders) at Handsworth Park (September 2019). Photography by Elliott Brown

 

SS Journey

It was sculpted in 2017 by Luke Perry as part of the Handsworth Arts Trail.

SS Journey

SS Journey by Luke Perry at Handsworth Park (September 2019). Photography by Elliott Brown

Project dates

02 Oct 2019 - On-going

Passions

Green open spaces

Contact

Your Place Your Space

Jonathan Bostock

0121 410 5520
jonathan.bostock@ yourplaceyourspace.com